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The American Phytopathological Society announces 2009 awardees

August 26, 2009

St. Paul, Minn. (August 26, 2009)-The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2009 awards. The awards were presented during the APS Awards & Honors Ceremony at the APS Annual Meeting held August 1-5, in Portland, Oregon.

The following APS members were recognized as Fellows in 2009 in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology or the society: James C. Carrington, Oregon State University, Botany and Plant Pathology Department; Martin Carson, USDA-ARS; Ann Renee Chase, Chase Horticultural Research, Inc.; Cesare Gessler, ETH Zurich; Walter Douglas Gubler, University of California-Davis, Plant Pathology Department; John Franklin Leslie, Kansas State University, Plant Pathology Department; David Marshall, USDA-ARS; Richard Nelson, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation; Timothy Paulitz, USDA-ARS; Patrick M. Phipps, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Herman B. Scholthof, Texas A&M University, Plant Pathology & Microbiology Department; and Robert Zeigler, International Rice Research Institute.

The Excellence in Extension Award was presented to Anne E. Dorrance, associate professor at The Ohio State University.

Charles Mellinger, director of technical services and vice president of Glades Crop Care, Inc., received the Excellence in Industry Award.

H. David Shew, a professor at North Carolina State University, received the Excellence in Teaching Award.

The International Service Award was presented to Richard A. Sikora, professor and head of the Soil Ecosystem Phytopathology & Nematology Section, University of Bonn, Germany.

James E. Adaskaveg, University of California-Riverside, Plant Pathology Department, received the Lee M. Hutchins Award.

Andrew Bent, University of Wisconsin, Plant Pathology Department, received the Noel T. Keen Award for Research Excellence in Molecular Plant Pathology.

The Ruth Allen Award was presented to Donald L. Nuss, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Center for Biosystems Research.

Ignazio Carbone, North Carolina State University, Department of Plant Pathology, received the Syngenta Award.
-end-
Full descriptions of each of the awardees are available at www.apsnet.org/members/awards. APS is a nonprofit, professional scientific organization. The research of the organization's more than 5,000 worldwide members advances the understanding of the science of plant pathology and its application to plant health.

American Phytopathological Society

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