Who hasn't had dental cavities?

August 26, 2010

A research study has for the first time revealed data about dental cavities, periodontal disease, oral treatment needs, the use of dental prostheses and dental hygiene habits among the adult population in the Valencia region. The results show that 90% of people have cavities and 20-35% need prostheses.

"These data will make it possible to draw comparisons with other studies carried out in other autonomous regions and nationwide ones", José Manuel Almerich, co-author of the study and a scientist at the University of Valencia (UV), tells SINC.

The study, published in the journal Medicina Oral, Patología Oral y Cirugía Bucal, for the first time provides data about the situation with regard to cavities, periodontal disease, oral treatment requirements and the use of dental prostheses in two age cohorts (35-44 and 65-74) in the adult population of Valencia. The study also includes an analysis of these people's oral hygiene habits.

The prevalence of cavities was above 90% in the two samples studies. Social class and educational levels have an impact on the presence of cavities, with those with lower social and education levels having more cavities. Nationality also has an impact, with foreigners having more untreated cavities.

Among the people aged 65 to 74, 20.7% are 'totally toothless'. "From these data we can deduce that the dental status of the institutionalised geriatric population is significantly worse than that of elderly adults living in their homes", says Almerich.

In terms of periodontal disease, the second most prevalent problem, the most disadvantaged social classes again present the worst health status, while the need for dental prostheses fluctuates between 20-35% for the entire population studied, increasing in the older age group.

Bad habits starting in childhood

The study confirms our poor dental hygiene habits and rare visits to the dentist. "Preventive efforts should be aimed at raising awareness about the need for early diagnosis of problems and the best possible oral hygiene", the Valencian researcher suggests.

The findings of this study underline the need to improve dental care among adults. The authors highlight the need to develop new policies that will improve prevention as well as dental care measures "that will make it possible to improve the bucodental map within a few years".
-end-
References: María-Vicenta Eustaquio, José-María Montiel, José-Manuel Almerich. "Oral health survey of the adult population of the Valencia region (Spain)". Medicina Oral, Patología Oral y Cirugía Bucal 1;15 (3):e538-44, mayo de 2010. DOI:10.4317/medoral.15.e538.

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Related Periodontal Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

Forsyth researchers demonstrate how changing the stem cell response to inflammation may reverse periodontal disease
In new research published recently in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, Forsyth Institute scientists have discovered that a specific type of molecule may stimulate stem cells to regenerate, reversing the inflammation caused by periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease: Patent for new treatment method
New biodegradable rods promise to provide better treatment for periodontal disease.

Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes
Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong.

Metabolomic profiling of antibody response to periodontal pathogens
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Jaakko Leskela, University of Helsinki, Finland, gave an oral presentation on 'Metabolomic Profiling of Antibody Response to Periodontal Pathogens.'

New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease
According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives.

Periodontal disease bacteria may kick-start Alzheimer's
Long-term exposure to periodontal disease bacteria causes inflammation and degeneration of brain neurons in mice that is similar to the effects of Alzheimer's disease in humans.

Systematic treatment of periodontal disease: Advantage of further therapeutic approaches
An indication or hint of greater benefit was now shown for six instead of two therapeutic measures.

Investigating the enigmatic link between periodontal inflammation and retinal degeneration
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Hyun Hong, The Dental College of Georgia at Augusta University, presented a poster titled 'Investigating the Enigmatic Link Between Periodontal Inflammation and Retinal Degeneration.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018.

The subgingival virome in periodontal health and disease
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Abby Siefker, The Ohio State University, Columbus, presented an oral session titled 'The Subgingival Virome in Periodontal Health and Disease.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018.

Oral microbiota indicates link between periodontal disease and esophageal cancer
An analysis of bacteria present in the mouth showed that some types of bacteria that lead to periodontal disease were associated with higher risk of esophageal cancer.

Read More: Periodontal Disease News and Periodontal Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.