Argonne scientist to give the plenary talk at Royal Society of Chemistry meeting on nanoalloys

August 27, 2007

Julius Jellinek, a senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, will deliver the plenary talk of the Faraday Discussion Meeting 138 on Nanoalloys: From Theory to Application, to be held on September 3-5, at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom.

The Faraday Discussions are organized by the Royal Society of Chemistry, and historically have been of enormous influence in reviewing the current status and shaping new directions in various areas of physical chemistry, chemical physics and bordering disciplines.

The subjects and participants are selected to represent an area and work of cutting edge importance. This is the first time that the Society chose the field of nanoalloys, and the meeting is the first major international symposium on this subject. It reflects the realization of the extremely interesting and complex science, as well as the immense technological potential, that arise from combination of size effects with composition effects. Together, these effects as applied to metals offer unprecedented opportunities in the design of nanosystems and nanodevices with principally new and tunable mechanical, thermal, electronic, optical, magnetic, and chemical characteristics.

In his talk entitled "Nanoalloys: Tuning Structural, Electronic, and Thermal Properties through Size and Composition," Jellinek will review the status of the field and will discuss some of the pioneering work he and his collaborators performed at Argonne. His talk will be followed by 24 reports from universities and research centers around the world and their extensive discussions. The proceedings of the meeting will appear as a volume in the series of Faraday Discussions published by the Royal Society of Chemistry. More details on the meeting can be found at www.rsc.org/FD138.
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The Royal Society of Chemistry is the largest organization in Europe for advancing the chemical sciences. Supported by a worldwide network of members and an international publishing business, its activities span education, conferences, science policy and the promotion of chemistry to the public.

With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne National Laboratory brings the world's brightest scientists and engineers together to find exciting and creative new solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation's first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America 's scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

For more information, please contact Sylvia Carson (630/252-5510 or scarson@anl.gov) at Argonne.

DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

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