New genetic markers of glucosinolates in rapeseed may help improve oil composition

August 27, 2020

A group of scientists from Skoltech and Pustovoit All-Russian Research Institute of Oil Crops in Krasnodar performed genetic analysis of the Russian rapeseed collection. The scientists described the genetic diversity of Russian rapeseed lines and discovered new candidate genes that are potentially involved in controlling the content of glucosinolates, toxic secondary metabolites in rapeseed oil. Their findings can be used by crop breeders to improve the rapeseed oil composition. The research was published in the Genes journal.

Rapeseed is the world's second-largest oilseed crop after soybeans. Glucosinolates are secondary metabolites of rapeseed and related cruciferous plants. The content of these glucose-derived sulfur-containing organic substances strongly influences oil quality: if present in large amounts, glucosinolates spoil the taste of rapeseed oil and affect the quality of rapeseed meal, compelling crop breeders to look for ways of reducing their content.

The scientists performed genome-wide genotyping of 90 rapeseed lines and compared the results with the glucosinolate content data for these lines collected over 3 growing seasons. This helped identify both the genetic markers of glucosinolate content in oil and the linked candidate genes potentially involved in regulating the biosynthesis of glucosinolates. Once verified on an independent set of plants, the markers can be readily used for breeding new varieties and hybrids with low glucosinolate content.

"Our research aims to foster marker-assisted crop breeding in Russia by using genetic markers to control the characteristics relevant to cross-breeding processes and progeny analysis. This approach can make the breeding of new varieties much faster. Measuring glucosinolates content is an arduous task that can be made much easier by using the markers we have identified", says Rim Gubaev, the first author of the paper and a PhD student at Skoltech.
-end-
Skoltech is a private international university based at the Skolkovo Innovation Center. Established in 2011 in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Skoltech cultivates a new generation of science, technology, and business leaders, engages in ground-breaking research, and fosters innovative technology to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Skoltech focuses on six target domains: Data Science & Artificial Intelligence, Life Sciences and Biomedicine, Cutting-edge Engineering & Advanced Materials, Energy Efficiency, Photonics & Quantum Technology, and Advanced Studies. Skoltech directs its efforts at strengthening Russia's technology excellence in the target domains.

Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)

Related Genetic Diversity Articles from Brightsurf:

In the Cerrado, topography explains the genetic diversity of amphibians more than land cover
Study shows that a tree frog endemic to a mountainous region of the Brazilian savanna is unable to disperse and find genetically closer mates when the terrain is rugged, potentially endangering survival of the species

New DNA sequencing technique may help unravel genetic diversity of cancer tumors
Understanding the genetic diversity of individual cells within a cancer tumor and how that might impact the disease progression has remained a challenge, due to the current limitations of genomic sequencing.

Researchers uncover the arks of genetic diversity in terrestrial mammals
Mapping the distribution of life on Earth, from genes to species to ecosystems, is essential in informing conservation policies and protecting biodiversity.

Seahorse and pipefish study by CCNY opens window to marine genetic diversity May 08, 2020
The direction of ocean currents can determine the direction of gene flow in rafting species, but this depends on species traits that allow for rafting propensity.

Study helps arboreta, botanical gardens meet genetic diversity conservation goals
In a groundbreaking study, an international team of 21 scientists evaluated five genera spanning the plant tree of life (Hibiscus, Magnolia, Pseudophoenix, Quercus and Zamia) to understand how much genetic diversity currently exists in collections in botanical gardens and arboreta worldwide.

Study reveals rich genetic diversity of Vietnam
In a new paper, Dang Liu, Mark Stoneking and colleagues have analyzed newly generated genome-wide SNP data for the Kinh and 21 additional ethnic groups in Vietnam, encompassing all five major language families in MSEA, along with previously published data from nearby populations and ancient samples.

Coastal pollution reduces genetic diversity of corals, reef resilience
A new study by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology found that human-induced environmental stressors have a large effect on the genetic composition of coral reef populations in Hawai'i.

New world map of fish genetic diversity
An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time.

Texas A&M study reveals domestic horse breed has third-lowest genetic diversity
A new study by Dr. Gus Cothran, professor emeritus at the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has found that the Cleveland Bay horse breed has the third-lowest genetic variation level of domestic horses, ranking above only the notoriously inbred Friesian and Clydesdale breeds.

Genetic diversity facilitates cancer therapy
Cancer patients with more different HLA genes respond better to treatment.

Read More: Genetic Diversity News and Genetic Diversity Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.