Oxford University Press acquires American Journal of Hypertension

August 28, 2012

Oxford University Press (OUP) today announced that the esteemed American Journal of Hypertension will be joining the publisher's journal collection.

Established in 1988, the American Journal of Hypertension is a highly regarded title providing a forum for scientific inquiry in the field of hypertension and related cardiovascular disease. It is a monthly, peer-reviewed journal with an Impact Factor of 3.181 (2011 Journal Citation Reports© by Thomson Reuters). The journal publishes high-quality original research and review articles on basic sciences, molecular biology, clinical and experimental hypertension, cardiology, epidemiology, pediatric hypertension, endocrinology, neurophysiology, and nephrology.

"Speaking for the Editors of the American Journal of Hypertension, we are delighted to be joining the excellent family of Oxford University Press journals. Their strong academic tradition, commitment to excellence, and worldwide presence promise to help us advance our goal of disseminating the best of current research on hypertension and its related clinical consequences," said Dr. Michael H. Alderman, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Hypertension.

The acquisition sees the continued expansion of OUP's substantial cardiology list, which includes the journals of the European Society of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the European Society of Cardiology.

"We're delighted to welcome the American Journal of Hypertension to the growing list of OUP titles in the area of cardiology, and we look forward to working with the Journal's editorial team to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the highest quality research in the field," said Niko Pfund, President of Oxford University Press USA.
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The first issue of the American Journal of Hypertension will be published by OUP from January 2013. Visit the website for more information, submission guidelines, and to sign up to receive tables of contents by email: ajh.oxfordjournals.org

For more information contact:

Lizzie Shannon-Little
Brand & Communications Assistant Manager
Oxford University Press
lizzie.shannonlittle@oup.com
+44 (0)1865 353043

Notes to editors

Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. OUP is the world's largest university press with the widest global presence. It currently publishes more than 6,000 new publications a year, has offices in around fifty countries, and employs more than 5,500 people worldwide. It has become familiar to millions through a diverse publishing programme that includes scholarly works in all academic disciplines, bibles, music, school and college textbooks, business books, dictionaries and reference books, and academic journals.

Oxford University Press

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