Will a reduction in military spending improve our environmental future?

August 30, 2004

WASHINGTON, DC - Former President of Costa Rica and 1987 Nobel Peace Laureate Dr. Óscar Arias Sánchez, one of the most revered political figures in Latin America, is advocating for international cooperation to improve the environmental future and is recommending that the global community consider a reduction of military spending.

Dr. Arias will give the annual Robert C. Barnard Environmental Lecture at AAAS on Tuesday, September 7 at 4:00 PM EST. A champion of human development, democracy, and demilitarization, Dr. Arias travels the globe spreading a message of peace and applying the lessons garnered from the Central American Peace Process to topics of current global debate, such as the current and future state of the environment.

The Robert C. Barnard Environmental Lecture provides an annual forum for an outstanding speaker to address current environmental issues. The lectureship is endowed by the international law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton to honor Mr. Barnard, counsel to the firm, for his contributions to environmental and public health law. The lecture is delivered during the orientation program for the incoming class of AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellows, in recognition of Mr. Barnard's long-time service as a member of the selection committee for the AAAS Environmental Fellowship Program. The fellowship program provides a cadre of post-doctoral to mid-career scientists, who serve at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in a program that is now 20 years old. For more information on the AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowships, please visit http://fellowships.aaas.org/.

WHAT: The Robert C. Barnard Environmental Lecture by Dr. Óscar Arias Sánchez

WHEN: Tuesday, September 7, 2004 at 4:00 PM EST

WHERE: AAAS Auditorium, 2nd floor
1200 New York Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20005

MEDIA NOTE: Please use the entrance at the intersection of 12th and H Streets and proceed to the 2nd floor.

RSVP: RSVP to Monica Amarelo at (202) 326-6431 or mamarelo@aaas.org .
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The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science (www.sciencemag.org). AAAS was founded in 1848, and serves some 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of one million. The non-profit AAAS (www.aaas.org) is open to all and fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through initiatives in science policy; international programs; science education; and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert!, www.eurekalert.org, the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS.

AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society, dedicated to "Advancing science · Serving society."

American Association for the Advancement of Science

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