Sports doping explored during half-day symposium, Aug. 30

August 30, 2005

WASHINGTON, Aug. 30 -- Nearly every major sport has been plagued by scandals involving the use of banned substances by athletes. In the wake of this growing problem, a group of researchers at the American Chemical Society's 230th national meeting in Washington, D.C., will discuss scientific and regulatory aspects surrounding the controversial topic of sports doping during a special half-day symposium on Tuesday, Aug. 30, from 8:55 a.m. - 11:35 a.m. at the Washington Convention Center, Room 156. The symposium is entitled "Preventing Doping in Sports: A Herculean Task." Highlights of the symposium include:

"Gene doping" in sports: A future challenge -- 'Gene doping' is defined as the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance, according to the World Anti-Doping Agency. Experts believe that these scientific advances, although still experimental, will some day be used by athletes to gain a competitive advantage. For example, certain growth factor compounds designed to treat muscle wasting disease might be used to boost muscle mass; erythropoietin (EPO), a hormone that regulates red blood cell production, might be genetically engineered to increase endurance; and 'PGC-alpha,' a gene involved in muscle signaling, could be used to activate specific muscle fibers to optimize performance. Rosario M. Isasi of the Université de Montréal in Canada will explore the cutting-edge issue of gene doping, including its scientific, regulatory and social implications. (CHAL 27, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 9:00 a.m.)

Designer steroids pose testing challenge -- Designer doping agents, including steroids, are available that allow athletes to gain a competitive advantage and evade normal testing controls. Christiane Ayotte of INRS-Armand-Frappier Institute's Doping Control Laboratory in Canada will discuss strategies for testing challenging steroids, identifying new substances and their properties, and obtaining information about sources and distribution of these steroids. (CHAL 29, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 10:00 a.m.)

U.S. Anti-Doping Agency: Setting high standards -- The U.S. Anti-doping Agency (USADA) has emerged as one of the most effective agencies in the world dedicated to "preserving the well being of Olympic sport, the integrity of competition, and ensuring the health of athletes." Jean L. Fourcroy, a USADA board member, will describe ongoing efforts to develop a comprehensive national program to fight sports doping, including testing, education, research and policies related to the organization's mission. (CHAL 30, Tuesday, Aug 30, 10:30 a.m.)

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization, chartered by the U.S. Congress, with a multidisciplinary membership of more than 158,000 chemists and chemical engineers. It publishes numerous scientific journals and databases, convenes major research conferences and provides educational, science policy and career programs in chemistry. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.
-end-


American Chemical Society

Related Steroids Articles from Brightsurf:

Study shows protective role sex steroids play in COVID-19
''Sex and Covid-19: A protective role for reproductive steroids,'' by Graziano Pinna, research associate professor in psychiatry, analyzes existing research to look at reasons why COVID-19 symptom severity and mortality are more frequent in men than in women and in older people.

New RA guideline emphasizes maximizing methotrexate and biologics, minimizing steroids
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview its 2020 Guideline for the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) at ACR Convergence, the ACR's annual meeting.

Microwaves are useful to combine amino acids with hetero-steroids
Aza-steroids are important class of compounds because of their numerous biological activities.

Early steroids improve outcomes in patients with septic shock
Some critically ill patients with septic shock need medications called vasopressors to correct dangerously low blood pressure.

Cumulative doses of oral steroids linked to increased blood pressure
Cumulative doses of oral steroids in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increased hypertension (blood pressure) for those who take them regularly, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Fewer steroids, no plasma exchange: A change in treatment for vasculitis
The insights from the PEXIVAS Trial, a 10-year study, shows treatment for ANCA-associated vasculitis can use half the standard dosage of steroids and involve no blood plasma exchanges.

Steroids could do more harm than good in treating coronavirus
Steroids should be avoided in the treatment of the current novel coronavirus, experts have advised.

Are steroids used too much for patients with inflammatory bowel disease?
Steroid therapy is commonly used to treat acute attacks of the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease; however, because it does not provide long-term benefits and it carries a risk of serious side effects, it should not be used to treat inflammatory bowel disease for more than three months.

One third of patients with severe asthma are taking harmful doses of oral steroids
A third of patients with severe asthma are taking harmful doses of oral steroids, according to a study of several thousand people in The Netherlands, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

Oral steroids put patients with inflammatory disease at high risk of infection
Oral steroid use in patients with the inflammatory diseases polymyalgia rheumatica and/or giant cell arteritis significantly increased the risk of infection, and the risk increased with higher doses, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Read More: Steroids News and Steroids Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.