Diamonds and quantum information processing on the nano scale

August 30, 2016

New York, NY - A City College of New York led-team headed by physicist Dr. Carlos Meriles has successfully demonstrated charge transport between Nitrogen-Vacancy color centers in diamond. The team developed a novel multi-color scanning microscopy technique to visualize the charge transport. The breakthrough experiment could potentially lead to room-temperature quantum information processing in diamond and optical data storage in three dimensions.

The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center is an optically active defect in diamond comprising a nitrogen atom and an adjacent vacancy, replacing carbon atoms in the diamond lattice. This defect has electrons that are capable of storing quantum information. To utilize this special property for quantum computation, it is required to create a network of interacting NV centers. The research so far has focused on using photons emitted by the NV centers to create this interaction under a special low temperature environment.

In a complementary approach the research team at City College in collaboration with researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra are envisioning an electron-transport-based interaction that is realizable in ambient conditions. In one of the key experiments reported a focused green laser beam was used to remove the electrons from the NV centers, which later diffused radially in the diamond. A red laser scan was used to image NV centers that trapped these diffused charges as far as 30 microns. The team exploited the difference in luminescence intensities of the NV centers with and without the electron to create a map of the trapped carriers.

"These are very promising initial results" said lead author Dr. Harishankar Jayakumar, a postdoctoral fellow at the Meriles group. Other key contributors are CCNY team members Dr. Siddharth Dhomkar, and graduate student Jacob Henshaw, as well as Dr. Marcus Doherty and Prof. Neil Manson at ANU.

The article appearing in the journal Nature Communications also discusses in detail the complex interactions of the charge carriers with other defects in diamond, uncovered by this technique. The National Science Foundation supported the research.
-end-
For more information, please contact: Shante Booker at Shante.Booker@cuny.edu.

Visit http://www.cuny.edu/research for more CUNY Research news.

The City University of New York

Related Electrons Articles from Brightsurf:

One-way street for electrons
An international team of physicists, led by researchers of the Universities of Oldenburg and Bremen, Germany, has recorded an ultrafast film of the directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial.

Mystery solved: a 'New Kind of Electrons'
Why do certain materials emit electrons with a very specific energy?

Sticky electrons: When repulsion turns into attraction
Scientists in Vienna explain what happens at a strange 'border line' in materials science: Under certain conditions, materials change from well-known behaviour to different, partly unexplained phenomena.

Self-imaging of a molecule by its own electrons
Researchers at the Max Born Institute (MBI) have shown that high-resolution movies of molecular dynamics can be recorded using electrons ejected from the molecule by an intense laser field.

Electrons in the fast lane
Microscopic structures could further improve perovskite solar cells

Laser takes pictures of electrons in crystals
Microscopes of visible light allow to see tiny objects as living cells and their interior.

Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors, linked together by thin films of metal.

Flatter graphene, faster electrons
Scientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the Department of Physics at the University of Basel developed a technique to flatten corrugations in graphene layers.

Researchers develop one-way street for electrons
The work has shown that these electron ratchets create geometric diodes that operate at room temperature and may unlock unprecedented abilities in the illusive terahertz regime.

Photons and electrons one on one
The dynamics of electrons changes ever so slightly on each interaction with a photon.

Read More: Electrons News and Electrons Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.