Nav: Home

Biosensor could help diagnose illnesses directly in serum

August 30, 2017

In this age of fast fashion and fast food, people want things immediately. The same holds true when they get sick and want to know what's wrong. But performing rapid, accurate diagnostics on a serum sample without complex and time-consuming manipulations is a tall order. Now, a team reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed a biosensor that overcomes these issues.

Field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors are ideal for point-of-care diagnostics because they are inexpensive, portable, sensitive and selective. They also provide results quickly and can be mass produced to meet market demand. These sensors detect the change in an electric field that results from a target compound, such as a protein or DNA, binding to it. But serum has a high ionic strength, or a high concentration of charged ions, that can mask the targets. Previous research has reported use of pretreatment steps, complex devices, and receptors with different lengths and orientations on the sensor surface, but with limited success. Alexey Tarasov and colleagues wanted to develop a new approach that would make it easier for FETs to be made as point-of-care diagnostic devices for serum analyses.

The researchers developed a FET sensor that included antibody fragments and polyethylene glycol molecules on a gold surface, which they linked to a commercially available transducer. In this configuration, different sensor chips can be swapped out for use with the same transducer. As a proof-of-principle, they tested the sensor with human thyroid-stimulating hormone. The team found that they could detect the hormone at sub-picomolar concentrations, well below the detection limit previously reported with FETs, when testing it at elevated temperatures. They say that the device could be modified to diagnose many conditions and illnesses, and is inexpensive and easy to use.

-end-

The authors acknowledge funding from the Roche Diagnostics GmbH.

The paper's abstract will be available on Aug. 30 at 8 a.m. Eastern time here: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acssensors.7b00187

The American Chemical Society is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: Twitter | Facebook

American Chemical Society

Related Fast Food Articles:

Study shows that cafes, restaurants and fast food outlets, and schools, are key sources of unhealthy, non-core foods for adolescents
Adolescents are getting many of their unhealthy, non-core foods such as soft drinks, chips, and sweets from cafes, restaurants, fast-food outlets (collectively called 'eateries'), and schools, according to a UK study presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Porto, Portugal.
For richer or poorer, we all eat fast food
Whether rich or poor, one thing unites Americans of all economic classes: Our love for fast food.
Researchers find strong link between fast-food ads and consumption among pre-schoolers
Pre-school age children who are exposed to child-targeted fast-food advertising on television are considerably more likely to consume fast-food products, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study in the journal Public Health Nutrition.
Journal: Researchers can track hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the body
Just one month after major research findings showed dangerous PFAS present in more than one-third of fast food packaging tested, UAB and Notre Dame created a new technique to track PFASs in the body.
Fast food packaging contains potentially harmful chemicals that can leach into food
A comprehensive analysis of fast food packaging in the US shows that many restaurants use food packaging containing highly fluorinated chemicals, or PFASs.
Some fast-food packaging contains potentially harmful fluorinated compounds
Grease-proof packaging has helped make pizzas, burgers and tacos on-the-go a less messy proposition.
New study finds extensive use of fluorinated chemicals in fast food wrappers
Previous studies have linked the chemicals to kidney and testicular cancers, thyroid disease, low birth weight and immunotoxicity in children, among other health issues.
Children with higher genetic risk for obesity respond more strongly to fast food ads
Dartmouth researchers have found that children with a genetic risk for obesity had greater activity in brain reward centers when watching fast food commercials, which could help us to understand why some children are more likely to overeat.
Food supply -- not 'live fast, die young' mentality -- makes male crickets chirpy
Shedding a few pounds might be a good strategy in the human dating game, but for crickets the opposite is true.
Delayed gratification associated with fast food frequency
A new study led by the American Cancer Society suggests that an ability to delay immediate gratification is associated with less frequent consumption of fast food.

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Oliver Sipple
One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple's split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Future Consequences
From data collection to gene editing to AI, what we once considered science fiction is now becoming reality. This hour, TED speakers explore the future consequences of our present actions. Guests include designer Anab Jain, futurist Juan Enriquez, biologist Paul Knoepfler, and neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris.