Nav: Home

Does the distance a patient has to travel affect where they choose to get their care?

August 31, 2009

PHILADELPHIA (August 28, 2009)--Do patients choose where to get their care based on how long it takes to them to get there? Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have recently documented a growing trend in the centralization of cancer surgery--more patients seeking care at high volume centers, which are generally located in metropolitan areas. While trends like this should improve patient outcomes, a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that there are still a good number of patients who will not travel a long distance to get their care.

"Based on results of previous studies, patient outcomes should be improved with centralization of cancer surgery, however, we are concerned that the long distances patients may need to travel will serve as a barrier to access to high volume centers," says Karyn Stitzenberg, M.D., M.P.H., who led the study while at Fox Chase and is currently adjunct assistant professor for the Department of Health Policy and Management at University of North Carolina. "Centralization at high volume centers comes with a cost, as some patients may need to travel long distances to reach high volume centers. These increased travel distances may pose a significant barrier to quality cancer care for some subsets of the population."

The study used discharge data from 1996-2006 for hospitals in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Patients ages 18 and over who were treated with surgery for colorectal, esophageal or pancreatic cancer were included. Over 272,000 procedures met criteria for inclusion in the study, specifically 5,273 esophageal, 13,472 pancreatic, 202,879 colon and 51,262 rectal procedures.

A shift from low volume to high volume centers occurred to varying degrees for esophageal, pancreatic and colon cancer procedures. The change was the greatest for esophageal and pancreatic cancer, which are less common than cancers of the colon and rectum. In contrast to 1996, the vast majority of procedures for these less common cancers are now performed at high volume centers.

Among the study population, travel distance increased for all patients, but more so for patients with less common cancers. For example, travel distance increased 72 percent for patients with esophageal cancer, compared to 17 percent for patients with colon cancer.

"Our study demonstrated that the increase in travel distance was a direct result of the trend toward centralization at high volume centers," adds Elin Sigurdson, M.D. Ph.D., F.A.C.S., head of surgical research at Fox Chase and co-author on the study. "This study also confirms what others have found, that disparities of cancer care exist. Since disadvantaged patients are more likely to remain at low volume centers, we worry that travel may increasingly serve as a barrier for these patients, especially during tough economic times."
-end-
Fox Chase Cancer Center is one of the leading cancer research and treatments centers in the United States. Founded in 1904 in Philadelphia as one of the nation's first cancer hospitals, Fox Chase was also among the first institutions to be designated a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1974. Fox Chase researchers have won the highest awards in their fields, including two Nobel Prizes. Fox Chase physicians are also routinely recognized in national rankings, and the Center's nursing program has received the Magnet status for excellence three consecutive times. Today, Fox Chase conducts a broad array of nationally competitive basic, translational, and clinical research, with special programs in cancer prevention, detection, survivorship, and community outreach. For more information, visit Fox Chase's web site at www.fccc.edu or call 1-888-FOX-CHASE or 1-888-369-2427.

Fox Chase Cancer Center

Related Pancreatic Cancer Articles:

What makes pancreatic cancer so aggressive?
Pancreatic cancer starts forming metastases early. The cancer itself, however, is usually only discovered late.
A one-two punch hits pancreatic cancer where it hurts
Researchers have uncovered a promising new approach to treating pancreatic cancer, by targeting the tissue around the tumor to make it 'softer' and more responsive to chemotherapy.
New era in precision medicine for pancreatic cancer
The development of new treatments for pancreatic cancer is set to be transformed by a network of clinical trials, aiming to find the right trial for the right patient, after a £10 million investment from Cancer Research UK today.
Sentinels in the blood: A new diagnostic for pancreatic cancer
Tony Hu, a researcher in the Biodesign Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics and his colleagues have devised a crafty method to identify pancreatic cancer early in its development.
Metastatic pancreatic cancer 'reprogrammed' for malignancy
Metastatic pancreatic cancer -- cancer that has spread from the pancreas to other tissues and is responsible for most patient deaths -- changes its metabolism and is 'reprogrammed' for optimal malignancy, according to new findings reported Jan.
More Pancreatic Cancer News and Pancreatic Cancer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...