Microbiology brought to life in Nottingham

August 31, 2010

Antimicrobial insect brains, mouth bacteria behaving badly and the hundreds of microbial communities that lurk in household dust are just some of the highlights at the Society for General Microbiology's autumn meeting in Nottingham next week.

The annual event takes place on 6-9 September at the Jubilee Campus, University of Nottingham. Over 150 top international experts will present cutting-edge scientific research covering a wide range of modern microbiology from bio-energy generation to the quest for new antibiotics.

Presentations include: A new diagnostic tool for influenza; How bacteria can recover precious metals; The link between fungal spores, allergy and asthma; The yeast protein that may hold the secrets to treating Parkinson's disease and how fungi in museums and libraries are contributing to biodeterioration of our cultural heritage.

Members of the public are invited to come and participate in the interactive performance: Stopping the Spread of Superbugs, taking place on Wednesday evening. The event, that made its debut at Cheltenham Science Festival 2010, brings to life on stage the scientific and ethical issues faced by infection control professionals and patients alike. Under the guidance of a panel of experts, the audience is asked to put themselves in the shoes of hospital decision makers and respond to questions whose answers are not-so-clear-cut ...
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For a complete meeting programme please visit www.sgmnottingham2010.org.uk

Members of the press wishing to attend any day of the meeting or specific sessions can do so by contacting Laura Udakis, SGM Press Manager l.udakis@sgm.ac.uk

Microbiology Society

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