New assessment predicts fracture risk for patients in long-term care

August 31, 2017

BOSTON - Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research have developed and validated a new assessment to predict the risk of falls in long-term care patients. The study on the assessment titled "Fracture Risk Assessment in Long-term Care (FRAiL)" was published today in the Journal of Gerontology Medical Science.

The FRAiL model was developed by following a large cohort of nursing home residents over a 2 year period to identify which risks most often led to hip fractures for those living in a nursing home. By studying a sample of only nursing home residents, the FRAiL model was able to identify those fracture risks which are unique to nursing home residents, and ultimately differ quite a bit from the fracture risks facing seniors living independently.

What the study revealed is a collection of characteristics that are significant predictors of hip fracture in nursing home residents. These factors are: older age, white race, female, impaired cognition, independence in the activities of daily living, locomotion independence, urinary continence, previous falls, transfer independence, easily distractible, proclivity towards wandering, and others. For both men and women in nursing homes, it seems that the more independently mobile one is, the more apt they are to fall and incur a hip fracture. This is in direct opposition to seniors who live outside of the nursing home, who are more apt to fall and incur a fracture if they are less independent in their daily living skills.

The new FRAiL assessment is an important tool for senior long-term care providers as nearly 10% of hip fractures occur among nursing home residents. Of those nursing home residents who incur fractures, 36% will die within 6-months, and another 17.3% will become completely disabled. If service providers can screen for falls risk early on, they may be able to prevent debilitating and life threatening hip fractures before they occur.

Sarah D. Berry, MD, MPH and lead author of the study said, "The FRAiL model is the first clinical tool that could be used to discriminate residents at high risk for fracture and standardize fracture prevention efforts in the nursing home."
-end-
This study was supported by the National Institute on Aging (R01).

About Institute for Aging Research

Scientists at the Institute for Aging Research seek to transform the human experience of aging by conducting research that will ensure a life of health, dignity and productivity into advanced age. The Institute carries out rigorous studies that discover the mechanisms of age-related disease and disability; lead to the prevention, treatment and cure of disease; advance the standard of care for older people; and inform public decision-making. The Aging Brain Center within IFAR studies cognitive aging and conditions affecting brain health.

About Hebrew SeniorLife

Hebrew SeniorLife, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, is a national senior services leader uniquely dedicated to rethinking, researching and redefining the possibilities of aging. Based in Boston, the non-profit, non-sectarian organization has provided communities and health care for seniors, research into aging, and education for geriatric care providers since 1903. For more information about Hebrew SeniorLife, visit http://www.hebrewseniorlife.org, follow us on Twitter @H_SeniorLife, like us on Facebook or read our blog.

Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research

Related Hip Fracture Articles from Brightsurf:

Hip fracture risk linked to nanoscale bone inflexibility
New research has highlighted a preventative treatment gap in patients prone to bone fractures who are otherwise healthy.

Study seeks to explain decline in hip fracture rates
In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today, researchers showed how analysis of data from the multigenerational Framingham Osteoporosis Study may in part explain why the incidence of hip fracture in the US has declined during the last two decades.

'Remarkably high' rate of suicide among elderly patients after hip fracture
Older adults who suffer a hip fracture requiring surgery are at a higher risk of suicide, suggests a study in the June 17, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Low physical function increase the risk for bone loss in older hip fracture patients
Low physical function and low muscle mass after hip fracture increased the risk for accelerated bone deterioration in older hip fracture patients.

Study reports nursing home hip fracture rates stay persistently high
A recent study of hip fracture rates in nursing homes in the U.S. reports a slight rise in the rate of hip fractures among long-stay residents in recent years.

Vitamin D boosts chances of walking after hip fracture
Senior citizens who are not vitamin D deficient have a better chance of walking after hip fracture surgery, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Does tramadol increase hip fracture risk?
An analysis published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research reveals that use of the pain medication tramadol was linked with a higher risk of hip fractures compared with the use of other pain medications in an analysis of a patient database from the United Kingdom.

Study finds association between therapy time, length of stay after hip fracture surgery
Researchers in the George Washington University Advanced Metrics Lab found that a hip fracture patient's length of stay in a rehabilitation facility has a greater impact on functional independence than therapy time per day

Multicomponent home-based treatments improve mobility in older adults after hip fracture
Each year more than 260,000 older Americans are hospitalized for hip fractures, a debilitating injury that can severely and permanently impact mobility.

Excellence payments to hospitals improve hip fracture care
A scheme that pays hospitals to deliver high quality care has been shown to improve the outcomes for patients with broken hips in England.

Read More: Hip Fracture News and Hip Fracture Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.