A seat on the aisle, please!

September 01, 2006

Many women are more familiar than they want to be with the public toilet in their community. Some even plan their day around visits to the ladies' room. Others suffer recurrent urinary infections. In the course of a lifetime, more than half of all women will experience some form of debilitating urinary tract disease or discomfort, including infections, incontinence, pelvic floor prolapse, and interstitial cystitis. Until recently, there has been only scant attention paid to this very common group of disorders.

A Seat on the Aisle, Please! will help women identify and understand urinary tract disorders and play a more informed and active role in seeking help from their physicians. In her years as a practicing urologist, author Dr. Elizabeth Kavaler has come to believe that women of all ages suffer needlessly, and for far too long, from many kinds of pelvic disorders and urinary tract discomforts that can be treated and relieved. In the Introduction she writes, "My book touches on disorders that affect millions of women, most of whom have no idea were to turn for help. I am aware of the difficulties that women face when they are seen by male urologists, who traditionally treat male problems."

In this concise, clearly written, and sympathetic new book, Kavaler suggests that a new approach to urinary tract disorders is long overdue. One of the surprisingly small number of women practicing urology in the U.S., she explains what these diseases are and what patients can do to get themselves diagnosed and treated properly. But more than that, Dr. Kavaler extends expert, sympathetic, and helpful advice to those who've been distressed, embarrassed, and isolated for too long.
-end-
Elizabeth Kavaler, MD, earned her medical degree from the State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn. After residencies in surgery and urology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, she joined the staff there and worked with the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Department of Urology at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. Dr. Kavaler spent a year at the UCLA Medical Center as a fellow under the tutelage of one of the fathers of female urology, Dr. Shlomo Raz. Now in private practice in New York, she is one of only five hundred woman urologists in practice in the United States. This is her first book.

Elizabeth Kavaler
A Seat on the Aisle, Please!
The essential guide to urinary tract problems in women
Springer. 2006, 413 pp., 50 illus.
Hardcover EUR 22.95, £17.50, $27.50, sFr 42.00
ISBN: 978-0-387-95509-4

Springer

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