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The Disappearing Spoon author Sam Kean takes on the megalodon myth

September 02, 2014

WASHINGTON, September 2, 2014 -- Best-selling author Sam Kean stops by Reactions this week to debunk the myth of the Megalodon, the 50-foot super shark that, despite what "Shark Week" may lead you to believe, is long extinct. Learn all about it at http://youtu.be/KhFygIoW_MA.

Kean's book, "The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements," is getting the Reactions treatment in a 10-episode video series produced for the newly launched American Association of Chemistry Teachers (AACT). In this episode, Kean unravels the myth of a living Megalodon, explaining how the element manganese holds the key.
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To view all 10 episodes of the Disappearing Spoon video series, become an AACT member at http://www.teachchemistry.org.

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