Liquid Golf Clubs

September 02, 1998

Golf club heads made using a new metal alloy known as 'Liquidmetal' are being developed by an American manufacturer to make the high performance drivers and irons of the future. These clubs will allow golfers to hit longer shots and feel less of a 'sting' from the impact between club-head and ball as a result of the alloy's unique properties.

The new alloy used in the club-head has a structure similar to that of glass. This means that is extremely strong for its weight and is also extremely hard. When the club connects with the golf ball, the alloy absorbs less energy than conventional club-head materials and as a result more energy from the swing is transferred to the ball. The damping properties of the metal act to reduce the shock of impact between golf club and ball giving the new club a 'soft yet solid' feel when playing a shot.

Liquidmetal's high tensile strength, hardness and excellent fracture toughness mean that the alloy has many improved properties over traditional metals and alloys. This makes the alloy attractive for potentially replacing traditional materials used in sporting goods, aircraft airframes, medical and aerospace products.

PLEASE MENTION MATERIALS WORLD AS THE SOURCE OF THIS ITEM

For further information or a full copy of the article please contact Andrew McLaughlin on tel: 0171 451 7395; fax: 0171 839 2289 or email: Andrew_Mclaughlin@materials.org.uk

Notes for Editors

  1. Materials World is the journal of the Institute of Materials, the professional body of over 18,000 materials scientists and engineers throughout Europe.

  2. The journal is distributed to all of the Institute's members who work in areas such as plastics, rubber, steel, metals and ceramics.

  3. Materials World is also available on the web: http://www.materials.co.uk/mwldweb/mwhome.htm

  4. For further information Liquidmetal and its uses, please contact Andrew McLaughlin to arrange an interview.
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Institute of Materials

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