Alzheimers Disease Could Soon Be Treated With Nose Drops

September 02, 1998

Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders could soon be treated with nose drops. Researchers in Minnesota say that the nasal passage holds great promise as a conduit for delivering drugs into the brain, as the olfactory system provides a direct link between the brain and the outside world.

Getting drugs into the brain is one of neuroscience's challenges. The molecules of many drugs are too large to cross the blood-brain barrier, the tightly woven cells in the blood vessels in and around the brain that form a kind of protective fence guarding brain tissue. Nerve growth factor, a promising treatment for Alzheimer's disease, is one such drug. Injecting NGF does not work, and procedures such as grafting NGF-producing cells directly into the brain are expensive and risky.

But William Frey, a neuroscientist at the Alzheimer's Research Center at the Regions Hospital in St Paul, woke one morning with the idea of using nose drops to carry NGF to the brains of his patients. "I knew that bad things could get in this way," he says. "It occurred to me that maybe good things could get in this way too."

Olfactory nerves are unusual in that they run straight from the olfactory bulb in the brain to the nasal cavity, where they come into contact with "odorants" in the air. But occasionally, Frey points out, the odd anatomy of the olfactory system can be dangerous because it provides a way for some viruses, such as herpes, to sneak into the brain. In one study, even tiny gold particles sprayed into the noses of monkeys were traced along the olfactory nerves and into the animals' brains.

So Frey and his colleagues decided to see if NGF could be delivered in nose drops. After anaesthetising 12 rats, the researchers gave half the animals drops in their noses over 30 minutes and injected the rest with NGF. They found that within an hour, a significant amount of NGF had made its way not only into the olfactory bulb, but also into the hippocampus, amygdala and other regions not directly involved in smelling. In contrast, very little of the NGF injected into the other rats reached the brain. The same results held true when the researchers administered insulin growth factor 1, a possible treatment for stroke, in nose drops.

Frey's team will report on its findings at a meeting of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in San Francisco in November. The nose, they say, could deliver drugs not only for Alzheimer's disease but for a range of other neurodegenerative conditions as well, including Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. The team has a patent on the idea and is working with a biotechnology company to develop it.

Author: Alison Motluk
New Scientist issue 5th September 1998, page 6

PLEASE MENTION NEW SCIENTIST AS THE SOURCE OF THIS ITEM
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New Scientist

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