Why we need better estimates of global demand for an HIV vaccine

September 04, 2006

To really make a difference in halting the AIDS pandemic, an HIV vaccine "must be demanded by individuals and government authorities," say Robert Hecht (International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) and Chutima Suraratdecha (Program for Appropriate Technology in Health) in a policy paper in PLoS Medicine.

"Reliable estimates of demand for an HIV vaccine," they say "would help in achieving several policy and advocacy objectives." These objectives, they say, include: persuading governments and industry to invest more in research and product development convincing donors to finance vaccine purchases, in advance or at the time of uptake, given the limited ability of governments and individuals in developing countries to pay for a vaccine helping industry to determine the scale of manufacturing facilities to build to ensure adequate production capacity guiding research portfolio management decisions by highlighting how vaccine characteristics may affect demand guiding governments in planning their HIV vaccination programs.
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Citation: Hecht R, Suraratdecha C (2006) Estimating the demand for a preventive HIV vaccine: Why we need to do better. PLoS Med 3(10): e398. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0030398

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030398

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-10-hecht.pdf

CONTACT:

Robert Hecht
The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative
Public Policy
110 William St.
New York, NY 10038
United States of America
+1 212-847-1052
+1 212-847-1112 (fax)
rhecht@iavi.org

About PLoS Medicine

PLoS Medicine is an open access, freely available international medical journal. It publishes original research that enhances our understanding of human health and disease, together with commentary and analysis of important global health issues. For more information, visit http://www.plosmedicine.org

About the Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a non-profit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. For more information, visit http://www.plos.org

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