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ASNC announces multisocietal cardiac amyloidosis imaging consensus

September 04, 2019

The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) published "ASNC/AHA/ASE/EANM/HFSA/ISA/SCMR/SNMMI Expert Consensus Recommendations For Multimodality Imaging in Cardiac Amyloidosis" in their Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. ASNC assembled a writing team of 26 experts in cardiovascular imaging and amyloidosis representing these nine societies: The American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE), the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA), the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA), the Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR), and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI). Emerging imaging methods have facilitated earlier diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis and improved prognostication and management with new treatment options. The diagnostic criteria for cardiac amyloidosis, required updating to include these novel imaging tools.

The purpose of this document is to (1) achieve multisocietal consensus on standardized imaging methods, image acquisition, interpretation, and reporting; (2) develop multisocietal consensus criteria for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis combining histopathology, laboratory, and imaging features; and (3) define appropriate use of imaging in cardiac amyloidosis. The writing group reviewed and summarized available literature for imaging in cardiac amyloidosis, and provided comprehensive expert recommendations regarding the role of imaging in cardiac amyloidosis based on evidence combined with expert opinion.

The joint expert consensus document on imaging cardiac amyloidosis is divided into two parts:"For the first time, imaging experts conferred with heart failure experts and amyloidosis experts to provide guidance on standardized imaging techniques, diagnostic criteria, and appropriate utilization of echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide imaging in cardiac amyloidosis. We anticipate that these expert multisocietal consensus recommendations on multimodality imaging in cardiac amyloidosis will standardize the diagnosis and improve the management of this highly morbid and underdiagnosed disease." state writing chairs, Sharmila Dorbala, MD, MPH, FASNC, Director of Nuclear Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Jamieson Bourque, MD, MHS, FASNC, Director of Nuclear Cardiology at the University of Virginia.

The experts in the writing group envision that the use of these consensus recommendations will improve the clinical care and outcomes of individuals affected by cardiac amyloidosis particularly with newly approved treatments now available. The literature gaps identified could spur relevant research to broaden the understanding of this complex disease and support future development of imaging guidelines for cardiac amyloidosis.

Cardiac amyloidosis is emerging as an underdiagnosed cause of heart failure and mortality characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils (misfolded protein deposits) into myocardial tissue. An ideal non-invasive diagnostic method would identify cardiac involvement in amyloidosis and would also con?rm the etiologic subtype. No existing diagnostic tools can provide this information individually, necessitating a multimodality cardiac imaging approach.
-end-
This consensus statement is jointly published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, and the Journal of Cardiac Failure.

View additional ASNC cardiac amyloidosis resources https://www.asnc.org/cardiacamyloidosis

About the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

For over 25 years, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology and its more than 4,300 members have been improving cardiovascular outcomes through image-guided patient management. As the only society dedicated solely to the field of nuclear cardiology, ASNC establishes standards for excellence in cardiovascular imaging through the development of clinical guidelines, professional medical education, advocacy and research development. ASNC provides peer-reviewed original articles through its official publication Journal of Nuclear Cardiology and operates the nation's first noninvasive cardiac imaging registry, ImageGuide Registry®, to benchmark quality and improve patient care. For more information, visit http://www.asnc.org.

American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

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