1 sample examined by 1,000 pathologists -- how and why?

September 05, 2007

This week, more than eight hundred pathologists from around Europe and the world will take part in a first of its kind, large-scale virtual microscopy slide seminar on the web. The seminar is arranged by the Biomedical Informatics Research Group from the University of Helsinki in conjunction with the 21st European Congress of Pathology, which will be held in Istanbul, Turkey.

"To our knowledge this is the first time the complete microscopy slide set of a major international pathology conference has been digitized and made viewable on the web for the participants, and is as such a milestone in virtual microscopy and pathology", says Mikael Lundin, M.D., who is responsible for the technical development within the project called WebMicroscope.

Each of the participating pathologists can review the microscopy samples beforehand and some of the cases are so rare that they have been assembled into a special collection entitled 'Once in a Pathologist´s Lifetime'. During the congress in Istanbul the cases will be discussed, and diagnoses and consensus statements will be published on the website after the congress. The entire slide set will then be open for public use without password restrictions, to act as a case archive and educational tool.

The original samples reside on ordinary sized microscopy glass slides, but a single 'virtual slide' digitized at a thousand fold magnification can contain more than 60 gigabyte of data. In all, 160 specimens have been digitized for the purpose of the congress and sum up to more than 5 terabytes. Due to highly efficient compression techniques and a viewing system adopted from the satellite imaging industry, this amount of data is possible to handle. "Viewing of the samples very much resembles the use of Google Earth and puts only modest requirements on the pathologist's computer" says Dr. Lundin.

All virtual slides have been copied to five mirror servers around Europe, allowing pathologists to view the samples from the server with the best connection speed. "The network of servers also marks the foundation of a novel European Virtual Microscopy Network", Dr. Lundin says. In the first phase, as part of a multicenter scientific study, mirror servers in Finland, Sweden, Poland, Spain and Holland will be used. "By joining the network a department can ensure an excellent connection speed and access to common educational material within the pathology community of Europe."
-end-
The technology for viewing digitized images of entire microscope specimens on the web is the result of a joint research and development project between the Biomedical Informatics Research Group, headed by Johan Lundin, M.D., PhD, at the University of Helsinki, and one of the pioneers of virtual microscopy, Professor Jorma Isola from the Institute of Medical Technology at the University of Tampere, Finland.

Please find more information:

http://www.webmicroscope.net
http://www.webmicroscope.net/seminars/ECP2007.asp

University of Helsinki

Related Data Articles from Brightsurf:

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed.

Astronomers are bulging with data
For the first time, over 250 million stars in our galaxy's bulge have been surveyed in near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light, opening the door for astronomers to reexamine key questions about the Milky Way's formation and history.

Novel method for measuring spatial dependencies turns less data into more data
Researcher makes 'little data' act big through, the application of mathematical techniques normally used for time-series, to spatial processes.

Ups and downs in COVID-19 data may be caused by data reporting practices
As data accumulates on COVID-19 cases and deaths, researchers have observed patterns of peaks and valleys that repeat on a near-weekly basis.

Data centers use less energy than you think
Using the most detailed model to date of global data center energy use, researchers found that massive efficiency gains by data centers have kept energy use roughly flat over the past decade.

Storing data in music
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for embedding data in music and transmitting it to a smartphone.

Life data economics: calling for new models to assess the value of human data
After the collapse of the blockchain bubble a number of research organisations are developing platforms to enable individual ownership of life data and establish the data valuation and pricing models.

Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible
Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary in Nature by members of the Enabling FAIR Data Steering Committee.

Democratizing data science
MIT researchers are hoping to advance the democratization of data science with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data.

Getting the most out of atmospheric data analysis
An international team including researchers from Kanazawa University used a new approach to analyze an atmospheric data set spanning 18 years for the investigation of new-particle formation.

Read More: Data News and Data Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.