New search engine 'revolutionary'

September 06, 2005

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: A 26-year-old PhD student from the University of New South Wales has patented a new way of exploring the web that could revolutionise existing search engines.

Developed by Ori Allon, the Orion TM search engine is designed to complement searches conducted on services such as Google, Yahoo or MSN Search.

Search engines find pages on which keywords occur. Sometimes these pages are important to the topic. Other times they are not.

OrionTM finds pages where the content is about a topic strongly related to the key word. It then returns a section of the page, and lists other topics related to the key word so the user can pick the most relevant.

"The results to the query are displayed immediately in the form of expanded text extracts, giving you the relevant information without having to go the website--although you still have that option if you wish," said Israeli-born Allon, who completed a Bachelor and Masters degree at Monash University in Melbourne before moving to UNSW for his PhD.

"By displaying results to other associated key words directly related to your search topic, you gain additional pertinent information that you might not have originally conceived, thus offering an expert search without having an expert's knowledge.

"Take a search such as the American Revolution as an example of how the system works. OrionTM would bring up results with extracts containing this phrase. But it would also give results for American History, George Washington, American Revolutionary War, Declaration of Independence, Boston Tea Party and more. You obtain much more valuable information from every search."

The idea of finding information without having to click through to websites came from Allon's supervisor, Eric Martin, back in March this year. "I provided the spark. But it is Ori who has developed this through his amazing creativity and sheer hard work over these past months," said Mr Martin.

Andrew Stead of New South Innovations, the technology transfer company within UNSW, says he is confident that Orion TM will fill a gap in the market noted by Microsoft founder Bill Gates.

"Bill Gates was recently quoted in Forbes magazine as saying that we need to take the search way beyond how people think of it today. We believe that OrionTM will do that."

Allon said some big companies already had shown some initial interest in implementing Orion for commercial use.
-end-
CONTACT DETAILS: Ori Allon, 61-293-856-225; mobile 61-431-609-567, e-mail: oria@cse.unsw.edu.au;

Media contact: Mary O'Malley, 61-293-852-873, mobile 61-438-881-124, e-mail: m.omalley@unsw.edu.au; NewSouth Innovations: Andrew Stead, 61-29-385-7686, 61-040-801-0234, a.stead@unisearch.com.au

Date Issued: September 5, 2005

University of New South Wales

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