Plastic Surgery 2006 spotlights the future of plastic surgery

September 06, 2006

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. -- From new data on psychological and physical benefits, to futurists, economists and plastic surgeons sharing their vision of the future of plastic surgery, the hottest topics, technologies, and advances will be presented at Plastic Surgery 2006. The meeting, held Oct. 6-11 at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco, will be attended by more than 6,000 doctors, medical personnel and exhibitors in the field of plastic surgery.

"As ASPS celebrates 75 years of history and advances in plastic surgery, this year's meeting will look ahead, focusing on the future needs and demands of patients," said ASPS President Bruce Cunningham, MD. "The meeting will bring an array of leading experts together who will reflect on past clinical advances and focus on future trends and how they will impact consumers, business and healthcare. With the number of procedures performed on the rise, the information presented will help plastic surgeons ensure that new devices are safe, as well as, meeting consumer demands."

J. Ian Morrison, PhD, international author, consultant and futurist, will be the keynote speaker on Saturday, Oct. 7 at 4:30 p.m., during Opening Ceremonies at the Moscone Convention Center. Morrison, who specializes in long-term forecasting on healthcare, will examine the history of plastic surgery and discuss the political and economic future of the specialty and healthcare. Opening Ceremonies will also feature the annual Patients of Courage: Triumph Over Adversity awards honoring inspirational reconstructive plastic surgery patients for their courage and altruism.

The ASPS Industry Forum will be held on Monday, Oct. 9 from 12:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., featuring leading financial analysts, industry CEOs and plastic surgeons who will provide insight into the business of plastic surgery. The Forum will include a discussion on the industry of breast implants, facial aesthetics, injectable wrinkle fighters, body contouring technologies, market trends, statistics, and more.

Panels, courses and studies presented at Plastic Surgery 2006 include:
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For a full listing of Plastic Surgery 2006 activities, visit www.plasticsurgery.org.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. With more than 6,000 members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Note: Reporters can register to attend Plastic Surgery 2006 and arrange interviews with presenters by logging on to www.plasticsurgery.org/news_room/Registration.cfm or by contacting ASPS Public Relations at (847) 228-9900 or in San Francisco, Oct. 7-11 at (415) 905-1730.

Reporters interested in attending Opening Ceremonies on Saturday, Oct. 7 should notify ASPS Public Relations by Friday, Oct. 6 at (847) 228-9900. The Press Room will not be open on Saturday. If you have questions onsite regarding Saturday programs, please call ASPS Public Relations at (847) 804-5086.

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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