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IIVS announces suite of non-animal methods to reduce animal testing for skin sensitization

September 06, 2016

GAITHERSBURG, MD - September 6, 2016 - In response to a newly published OECD Test Guideline, IIVS announces the addition of the Human Cell Line Activation Test (h-CLAT, OECD TG 442E) to its suite of non-animal assays to determine skin sensitization.

The assessment of skin sensitization has historically involved the use of laboratory animals; specifically guinea pigs and mice. In recent years, international research and validation efforts have paved the way for the use of non-animal methods.

"Industry has provided the field with very useful tools to help us move away from the use of animals for skin sensitization" said Erin Hill, President at IIVS.

The h-CLAT is the latest addition to our complement of assays, which includes DPRA, KeratinoSensTM and LuSens. Given the complex cascade of events leading to skin sensitization, an integrated testing approach combining multiple assays is recommended to assess skin sensitization most effectively.

The development of these non-animal methods has been supported by companies such as Kao, Shiseido, Procter & Gamble Co., Givaudan, and BASF (h-CLAT, DPRA, KeratinoSens and LuSens respectively). These assays have been through rigorous validation, and now each have an advanced regulatory status. In addition, integrated testing strategies and approaches have been proposed to the OECD to maximize the way in which these assays are used in combination with other resources such as the OECD Toolbox.
-end-
Visit the IIVS website to learn more about the above mentioned assays.

About IIVS

IIVS is a non-profit organization wholly dedicated to the promotion of rapid and innovative non-animal test methods. Founded in 1997, IIVS is recognized as a leading provider of in vitro testing in support of toxicological safety evaluations. Rigorous scientific programs coupled with educational and outreach initiatives have established IIVS as a global leader in the advancement of alternatives to animal testing. For more information, visit http://www.iivs.org.

Institute for In Vitro Sciences

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