International neurointerventional societies outline new criteria for facilities that treat stroke

September 06, 2018

Fairfax, Va. - The Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS) today joined 12 other neurointerventional societies to release new guidelines outlining the criteria for Level 1, 2 and 3 stroke centers that provide acute ischemic stroke interventions (AISIs) to stroke patients. The standards are published in the September issue of the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

Acute ischemic stroke caused by emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) is the leading cause of adult disability in the world. Recent studies have shown that neuroendovascular stroke surgery significantly improves outcomes in ELVO patients, especially if the patient receives the surgery in a timely fashion. To ensure positive patient outcomes, it is critical to ensure that facilities can provide the proper care to stroke patients in a safe and timely manner.

For the first time, the societies have specified criteria for Level 1, 2 and 3 stroke centers--terminology they believe will help health providers and the public better understand the capabilities of stroke treatment facilities. Level 1 centers need to offer the full spectrum of neuroendovascular services, including neuroendovascular stroke surgery. In addition to other requirements, these centers need to treat a minimum of 250 stroke patients per year and perform a minimum of 50 thrombectomies per year.

"ELVO patients should be taken to Level 1 stroke centers. Establishing guidelines for Level 2 stroke centers gives patients a chance at the best possible outcome in underserved regions," said Dr. Adam Arthur, president of SNIS and a neurointerventionalist at the Semmes-Murphey Clinic in Memphis, Tennessee. "These guidelines, issued by this eminent group of organizations, will help facilities around the world maintain the highest standard of care for stroke patients."

The guidelines recommend that Level 2 stroke centers see a minimum of 100 stroke patients per year and perform a minimum of 50 thrombectomies per year. Each neurointerventionalist in a Level 2 center should perform a minimum of 15 acute intracranial thrombectomies per year.

The guidelines recognize the challenges that newly created Level 2 stroke centers could face in meeting the minimum volume criteria for procedures. They allow for these centers to operate below the minimum threshold numbers as long as they expect to hit their volumes within 12 to 24 months.

The purpose of these guidelines is not to serve as a substitute for existing national and regional guidelines, but rather to outline the best recommendations based on expert opinions and the most current evidence available in stroke care around the world.
-end-
The following societies contributed to the development of these guidelines: Asian-Australian Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology (AAFITN), Australian and New Zealand Society of Neuroradiology (ANZSNR), American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR), Canadian Society of Neuroradiology (CSNR), European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), European Stroke Organisation (ESO), Japanese Society for NeuroEndovascular Therapy (JSNET), Ibero-Latin American Society of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology (SILAN), Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS), Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN), World Stroke Organization (WSO), and World Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology (WFITN).

About the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

The Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS) is a scientific and educational association dedicated to advancing the specialty of neurointerventional surgery through research, standard-setting, and education and advocacy to provide the highest quality of patient care in diagnosing and treating diseases of the brain, spine, head and neck. Visit http://www.snisonline.org and follow us on Twitter (@SNISinfo) and Facebook (@SNISOnline).

Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

Related Stroke Patients Articles from Brightsurf:

Stroke patients with COVID-19 have increased inflammation, stroke severity and death
Stroke patients who also have COVID-19 showed increased systemic inflammation, a more serious stroke severity and a much higher rate of death, compared to stroke patients who did not have COVID-19, according a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study of 60 ischemic stroke patients admitted to UAB Hospital between late March and early May 2020.

Heart failure patients have similar odds of dementia-type brain lesions as stroke patients
A type of brain damage linked with dementia and cognitive impairment is as common in heart failure patients as it is in patients with a history of stroke, according to findings from the LIFE-Adult-Study presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology.

How to help patients recover after a stroke
The existing approach to brain stimulation for rehabilitation after a stroke does not take into account the diversity of lesions and the individual characteristics of patients' brains.

Many stroke patients not screened for osteoporosis, despite known risks
Many stroke survivors have an increased risk of osteoporosis, falls or breaks when compared to healthy people.

Stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital are less likely to be readmitted
Stroke patients appear to receive better care at teaching hospitals with less of a chance of landing back in a hospital during the early stages of recovery, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Standardized stroke protocol can ensure ELVO stroke patients are treated within 60 minutes
A new study shows that developing a standardized stroke protocol of having neurointerventional teams meet suspected emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) stroke patients upon their arrival at the hospital achieves a median door-to-recanalization time of less than 60 minutes.

Drug reduces inflammation in stroke patients
An anti-inflammatory drug given to patients in the early stages of a stroke has been shown by researchers at The University of Manchester and Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust to reduce harmful inflammation.

Stenting system shown to benefit certain stroke patients
A specialized stenting system used to open blocked arteries in the brain resulted in a low complication rate among a specific group of patients with stroke histories, a study led by Cedars-Sinai researchers has found.

Combining stroke treatments shows improved outcomes for ELVO stroke patients
Intravenous thrombolysis pretreatment may improve mechanical thrombectomy outcomes in emergent large-vessel occlusions (ELVO) patients, according to a new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 14th Annual Meeting.

Stroke patients take the lead in their rehabilitation
EPFL spin-off Intento has developed a patient-controlled electrical-stimulation device that helps stroke victims regain mobility in paralyzed arms.

Read More: Stroke Patients News and Stroke Patients Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.