Nav: Home

Prevention programs significantly reduce ankle injuries in soccer athletes

September 07, 2016

ROSEMONT, Ill. (Sept. 7, 2016) -- Prevention programs are effective at reducing the risk of ankle injuries by 40 percent in soccer players, according to a new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS).

Injuries to the lower extremities are the most common in soccer. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), more than 227,700 people were treated for soccer-related injuries in 2015, including more than 36,300 with ankle injuries. These injuries can be traumatic, often sidelining players from the game for weeks or months.

Several prevention programs have been developed to address this concern. In a new analysis, researchers reviewed the data from 10 randomized controlled studies on ankle injury prevention programs, involving 4,121 female and male soccer players.

"This is the first study of its kind on ankle injuries in soccer athletes to strongly support injury prevention programs to reduce ankle injuries," said lead study author and orthopaedic surgeon Nathan Grimm, MD. "In our analysis, we were able to review the results from multiple studies, and make conclusions we could not make from any one study by itself."

The studies included neuromuscular, proprioceptive (balance), strengthening, and stretching exercises to prevent ankle injuries. They did not include bracing, taping or other external supports.

"This new data can be used by clinicians to provide evidence-based recommendations to their patients," explained Dr. Grimm. "It can also be used by coaches who wish to implement programs that will decrease the risk of injuries in athletes, and by the athletes who are trying to make the decision about participating in an injury prevention program."
-end-
Information on preventing ankle injuries in soccer is available at STOPSportsInjuries.org, an outreach program founded by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and seven other health organizations to educate the public about the importance of sports safety.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Related Athletes Articles:

Sleep disturbances predict substance use among college athletes
Preliminary results of a new study show that sleep disturbance is strongly related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs among student athletes in college.
Study looks at the prevalence, challenges of athletes with ADHD
It's estimated there are more than six million children in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Athletes' symptom anxiety linked to risk of injury
The anxiety experienced by elite athletes over illness symptoms is linked to the risk of being injured during competition and should be taken seriously, according to a study carried out at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2015 and led by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
Student-athletes not sleeping enough, intervention could help
Survey results suggest that more than 40 percent of college athletes aren't getting the amount of sleep recommended for healthy adults.
New research on the muscles of elite athletes: When quality is better than quantity
A Danish-Swedish research team working on a project led by University of Southern Denmark has discovered that muscle endurance is not only determined by the number of mitochondria, but also their structure.
Detecting a new doping trend among Olympic athletes
Olympics officials already contending with the illegal use of steroids among athletes are now being proactive about a potential new trend in performance enhancement: gene doping.
Robot therapist hits the spot with athletes
Trials of a prototype robot for sports therapy have just begun in Singapore, to create a high quality and repeatable treatment routine to improve sports recovery, reducing reliance on trained therapists.
Athletes with concussion maintain improvements after use of mirroring neurotechnology
Brain State Technologies announces that a series of young athletes with long-term symptoms after concussion showed a variety of lasting improvements, after using HIRREM® neurotechnology.
Athletes may have white matter brain changes 6 months after a concussion
New research finds white matter changes in the brains of athletes six months after a concussion.
Rio athletes may benefit from 'leaky gut' therapy
'Leaky gut' is a condition where the thin mucosal barrier of the gut, which plays a role in absorbing nutrients and preventing large molecules and germs from the gut entering the blood stream, becomes less effective.

Related Athletes Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...