Hip fracture often deadly, Australian study shows

September 07, 2017

Hip fracture is a major public health problem, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and high costs to the healthcare system. With the ageing of populations worldwide, the socioeconomic burden of hip fracture is set to rise dramatically.

A new Australian study published in Archives of Osteoporosis, looks at the 12-month mortality of older persons presenting to hospitals in Australia with hip fracture. It is the first large population-based matched cohort study exploring excess mortality risk from hip fracture in the Australian population while accounting for pre-injury comorbid conditions.

The researchers linked hospital and mortality data from four Australian states. 9748 Individuals aged 65 years and older who had a hospital admission with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture in 2009 were matched 1:1 on age, sex, and postcode of residence with a cohort of non-injured individuals selected from the electoral roll. Adjusted mortality rate ratios and attributable risk percent were calculated, and Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine the effect of risk factors on survival.

The researchers found that hip fracture sufferers experienced significantly worse survival at 12-months post-fracture:Dr Reidar P. Lystad from the Australian Institute of Health Innovation at Macquarie University and co-author of the study, stated:

"With an ageing population in Australia, the burden of hip fractures is expected to increase in the coming decades. Our findings suggest that, with the hip fracture trauma itself a main predictor of excess mortality, efforts may best be directed at primary and secondary prevention of the fracture itself."
-end-
Reference & Link to paper: Lystad RP, Cameron CM, Mitchell RJ. Mortality risk among older Australians hospitalised with hip fracture: a population-based matched cohort study. Arch Osteoporos (2017) 12:67 DOI 10.1007/s11657-017-0359-7 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11657-017-0359-7

About Archives of Osteoporosis

Archives of Osteoporosis is a joint initiative of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), USA. This online journal highlights the specificities of different regions around the world concerning epidemiology, reference values for bone density and bone metabolism, as well as clinical aspects of osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

Editors-in-Chief: John Kanis and Felicia Cosman

https://link.springer.com/journal/11657

About IOF

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is the world's largest nongovernmental organization dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and related musculoskeletal diseases. IOF members, including committees of scientific researchers as well as 240 patient, medical and research societies in 99 locations, work together to make fracture prevention and healthy mobility a worldwide heath care priority. http://www.iofbonehealth.org / http://www.facebook.com/iofbonehealth@iofbonehealth

http://www.worldosteoporosisday.org

International Osteoporosis Foundation

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