The Clorox Company's new indoor allergen product reduces common indoor allergens up to 90 percent

September 08, 2008

OAKLAND, Calif., September 8, 2008-For allergy sufferers, the choice all too frequently has come down to living without pets or curtains or anything that could trigger indoor allergens. Today, The Clorox Company extends its Anywhere® product line with the launch of Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray, a new product to help manage indoor allergens* on fabric surfaces in the home.

Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray denatures dust mite matter and pet dander by up to 90 percent. While most indoor allergen sprays trap or hide indoor allergens, Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray chemically breaks apart or denatures dust mite matter and pet dander allergens by altering the structure of the allergen protein.

"Replacing the carpet with hardwood floors or keeping the pets from the bedroom may not be options for financial or emotional reasons," said Jon Balousek, VP of Marketing. "Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray offers families who want to manage exposure to indoor allergens* another option."

Allergic rhinitis affects an estimated 20 to 40 million people in the United States alone, and the incidence is increasing. In fact, about 15 percent of the population is allergic to cats and dogs and 10 percent is allergic to dust mites. Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray works to denature allergens produced from these sources as they make themselves at home in fabrics throughout the house.

Keeps Fabrics Safe and Sound

Allergens thrive on fabrics and soft surfaces in the home making them a critical part of indoor allergen control. In fact, there may be more allergens on fabrics and soft surfaces (bedding, carpets, overstuffed furniture, stuffed toys) than in the air since these are the places dust mites thrive. Dust mites have been detected in 81 percent of television rooms and 80 percent of bedrooms.

Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray works directly on these fabric surfaces. It has been surface safety tested on 56 varieties of fabrics, and is safe to use as directed on virtually all fabric surfaces** in the home, including:
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About Clorox® Anywhere® Anti Allergen Fabric Spray

Clorox® Anywhere® Anti Allergen Fabric Spray, recent winner of the iParenting Media Award, is gentle enough to use around kids and pets and is dye and fragrance free with no harsh fumes. Clorox® Anywhere® Anti Allergen Fabric Spray will retail for $2.99 and will be available at major retailers nationwide. Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray can easily be incorporated into an indoor management routine. For more information on Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen Fabric Spray, visit www.clorox.com.

About The Clorox Company

The Clorox Company is a leading manufacturer and marketer of consumer products with fiscal year 2008 revenues of $5.3 billion. Clorox markets some of consumers' most trusted and recognized brand names, including its namesake bleach and cleaning products, Green Works™ natural cleaners, Armor All® and STP® auto-care products, Fresh Step® and Scoop Away® cat litter, Kingsford® charcoal, Hidden Valley® and K C Masterpiece® dressings and sauces, Brita® water-filtration systems, Glad® bags, wraps and containers, and Burt's Bees® natural personal care products. With 8,300 employees worldwide, the company manufactures products in more than two dozen countries and markets them in more than 100 countries. Clorox is committed to making a positive difference in the communities where its employees work and live. Founded in 1980, The Clorox Company Foundation has awarded cash grants totaling more than $73.9 million to nonprofit organizations, schools and colleges. In fiscal 2008 alone, the foundation awarded $4.2 million in cash grants, and Clorox made product donations valued at $10.2 million. For more information about Clorox, visit www.TheCloroxCompany.com.

*Dust mite matter and pet dander.

** As with all fabric products, test Clorox® Anywhere® Anti-Allergen on an inconspicuous site before using. Use as directed.

Ketchum DC

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