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AMP to recognize Eric Lander with 2016 Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics

September 08, 2016

BETHESDA, Md. - September 7, 2016 - The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostic professionals, today announced that Eric Lander, PhD, President and Founding Director of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and Professor of Biology at MIT and Professor of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School, has earned this year's Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics for his countless contributions to the field. The award will be presented at the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting on November 10, 2016 in Charlotte, N.C. Following the award presentation, Dr. Lander will deliver a special lecture on his 35-year journey uncovering insights to benefit human health.

A geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician, Dr. Lander's career has been focused on the reading, understanding, and biomedical application of the human genome. He was a principal leader of the Human Genome Project from 1990 to 2003. In 2008, he was appointed by President Obama as Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Dr. Lander's numerous honors and awards include the MacArthur Fellowship, the Woodrow Wilson Prize for Public Service from Princeton University, the City of Medicine Award, the Gairdner Foundation International Award of Canada, the AAAS Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology, the Albany Prize in Medicine and Biological Research, the Dan David Prize of Israel, the Mendel Medal of the Genetics Society in the UK, and the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.

"As one of the true early pioneers of the human genome, Dr. Eric Lander is a well-deserved recipient of the AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics," said Charles E. Hill, MD, PhD, AMP President. "Throughout his career, Dr. Lander and his colleagues have developed tools and applied methods that have transformed our understanding of the molecular basis of rare and common genetic diseases, including cancer. His seminal publications, fundamental discoveries, and significant scientific contributions have had a massive impact on human health by providing us with the framework for the modern practice of clinical molecular diagnostics. And, through his founding of the Broad Institute, he has helped a new generation of researchers take a collaborative approach to scientific discovery."

The AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics was created in 1998 to recognize lifetime, pioneering and special achievements by professionals in the fields of molecular biology, molecular pathology, pathology, genetics, microbiology, and basic medical sciences, especially as these achievements relate to molecular diagnostics and molecular medicine. Honorees' work has provided the scientific rationale for, or led to the development of, novel technologies for molecular diagnostics, and has contributed significantly to disease and patient management through their research. Previous recipients of the award can be found online.
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For more information on the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting, please visit: http://www.amp.org/meetings/2016.

For more information on media registration, please visit: http://www.amp.org/meetings/2016/media.cfm

To register as an attendee, please visit: http://www.amp.org/meetings/2016/registration

ABOUT AMP

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) was founded in 1995 to provide structure and leadership to the emerging field of molecular diagnostics. AMP's 2,300+ members practice in the various disciplines of molecular diagnostics, including infectious diseases, inherited conditions and oncology. They include individuals from academic and community medical centers, government, and industry; including pathologist and doctoral scientist laboratory directors; basic and translational scientists; technologists; and trainees. Through the efforts of its Board of Directors, Committees, Working Groups, and members, AMP is the primary resource for expertise, education, and collaboration in one of the fastest growing fields in healthcare. AMP members influence policy and regulation on the national and international levels, ultimately serving to advance innovation in the field and protect patient access to high quality, appropriate testing. For more information, visit http://www.amp.org.

Association for Molecular Pathology

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