Nav: Home

Hepatocellular carcinoma: Resection vs. transplantation

September 08, 2017

COLOGNE. Liver transplantation is the gold standard for treating early hepatocellular cancers. Because of the lack of donors, this option is, however, available to a limited degree only. Curative liver resection is an alternative in this setting. Markus B. Schoenberg, Julian N. Bucher, and coauthors investigated whether liver resection (LR) can yield results that are comparable to those of liver transplantation (LT) (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 519-26).

The authors conducted a meta-analysis of all available studies that compared LT and LR. From the published studies, they analyzed a subgroup consisting of patients with earlier hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in compensated cirrhosis, for which LR as well as LT would have been an option. 54 studies including 13 794 patients were included in the subgroup analysis. In this patient population, the researchers compared overall survival after 1, 3, and 5 years, as well as morbidity and mortality in LR and LT.

In patients with early HCC, LT yielded a higher survival rate than LR only after 5 years (66.67% versus 60.35%). After 1 and 3 years the differences did not reach significance. No significant difference in terms of morbidity and mortality was seen in this subgroup.

The researchers concluded that LR in early HCC provides comparably good survival and similar complication rates compared with LT for up to 3 years. Resection should be the objective if the conditions are met. In case of a recurrence, such patients can still be evaluated for transplantation. This strategy could improve the allocation of donor livers. To enable risk stratification, the therapeutic options for the patients should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting in specialized tumor boards.
-end-
https://www.aerzteblatt.de/pdf.asp?id=192677

Deutsches Aerzteblatt International

Related Mortality Articles:

New analysis shows hydroxychloroquine does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and is associated with increased mortality when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin
A new meta-analysis of published studies into the drug hydroxychloroquine shows that it does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and using it combined with the antibiotic azithromycin is associated with a 27% increased mortality.
Hydroxychloroquine reduces in-hospital COVID-19 mortality
An Italian observational study contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the use of hydroxychloroquine in the current pandemic.
What's the best way to estimate and track COVID-19 mortality?
When used correctly, the symptomatic case fatality ratio (sCFR) and the infection fatality ratio (IFR) are better measures by which to monitor COVID-19 epidemics than the commonly reported case fatality ratio (CFR), according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Anthony Hauser of the University of Bern, Switzerland, and colleagues.
COVID-19: Bacteriophage could decrease mortality
Bacteriophage can reduce bacterial growth in the lungs, limiting fluid build-up.
COPD and smoking associated with higher COVID-19 mortality
Current smokers and people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk of severe complications and higher mortality with COVID-19 infection, according to a new study published May 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jaber Alqahtani of University College London, UK, and colleagues.
Highest mortality risks for poor and unemployed
Large dataset shows that income, work status and education have a clear influence on mortality in Germany.
Addressing causes of mortality in Zambia
Despite the fact that people in sub-Saharan Africa are now living longer than they did two decades ago, their average life expectancy remains below that of the rest of the world population.
Examining the link between caste and under-five mortality in India
In India, children that belong to disadvantaged castes face a much higher likelihood of not living past their fifth birthday than their counterparts in non-deprived castes.
Mortality rates rising for Gens X and Y too
Declining life expectancies in the US include Gen X and Y Americans, in addition to the older Baby Boomers.
Trust in others predicts mortality in the United States
Do you trust other people? It may prolong your life.
More Mortality News and Mortality Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Debbie Millman: Designing Our Lives
From prehistoric cave art to today's social media feeds, to design is to be human. This hour, designer Debbie Millman guides us through a world made and remade–and helps us design our own paths.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Falling
There are so many ways to fall–in love, asleep, even flat on your face. This hour, Radiolab dives into stories of great falls.  We jump into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, upend some myths about falling cats, and plunge into our favorite songs about falling. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.