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This week from AGU: Mercury's spin, New Zealand fault, early-career scientists and research

September 09, 2015

GeoSpace
Mercury's movements give scientists peek inside the planet

The first measurements of Mercury's movements from a spacecraft orbiting the planet reveal new insights about the makeup of the solar system's innermost world and its interactions with other planetary bodies, found a new study recently accepted in Geophysical Research Letters.

New research calls for rethinking of New Zealand's Alpine Fault The major fault line of New Zealand's Alpine Fault, which runs almost the entire length of the South Island, has been assumed to be a near vertical crack. However, a new study of seismic data in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems has revealed the fault line becomes flatter at depth.

Eos.org
Helping early-career researchers succeed

Early-career scientists face many hurdles. Targeted programs can help them build skills, ease workloads, and form the collaborations they need to advance their careers.

YouTube
First observation of pulsating auroras in space

This video taken above Canada on February 19, 2014, shows the first satellite view of pulsating auroras, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

New research papers

Anomalous carbon uptake in Australia as seen by GOSAT, Geophysical Research Letters

Cloud organization and growth during the transition from suppressed to active MJO conditions, Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Ensemble modeling of the 23 July 2012 coronal mass ejection, Space Weather

MARSIS remote sounding of localized density structures in the dayside Martian ionosphere: A study of controlling parameters, Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
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Related Alpine Fault Articles:

The butterfly effect: Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
The long-term effects of climate change suggests that the butterfly effect is at work on butterflies in the alpine regions of North America, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists -- and the predictions don't bode well.
New study finds connection between fault roughness and the magnitude of earthquakes
A new study led by McGill University has found that tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface can show varying degrees of roughness and could help explain why certain earthquakes are stronger than others.
Making a connection: Two ways that fault segments may overcome their separation
In complex fault zones, multiple seemingly disconnected faults can potentially rupture at once, increasing the chance of a large damaging earthquake.
Baldness gene discovery reveals origin of hairy alpine plants
Scientists have solved a puzzle that has long baffled botanists -- why some plants on high mountainsides are hairy while their low-lying cousins are bald.
Mountain vegetation dries out Alpine water fluxes
ETH researchers confirm the paradox: rather than withering during droughts, plants at higher elevations absolutely thrive, as a study just published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows.
Alpine rock axeheads became social and economic exchange fetishes in the Neolithic
The mechanical capacity to resist successive transformation processes gave these rocks an exceptional exchange value that favoured the formation of long-distance exchange networks in Western Europe, according to a study led by the UAB that integrates petrography, materials science and paleoeconomics.
Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams, new research shows
Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research.
Alpine tundra releases long-frozen CO2 to the atmosphere, exacerbating climate warming
Thawing permafrost in high-altitude mountain ecosystems may be a stealthy, underexplored contributor to atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions.
Health checkups for alpine lakes
The best tool for assessing the health of mountain lakes comes in a very small package.
Alpine ice shows three-fold increase in atmospheric iodine
Analysis of iodine trapped in Alpine ice has shown that levels of atmospheric iodine have tripled over the past century, which partially offsets human-driven increases in the air pollutant, ozone.
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