Nav: Home

Cells from human umbilical cord blood improve cognition in Alzheimer's disease model mice

September 09, 2015

Putnam Valley, NY. (Sept. 9, 2015) - Alzheimer's disease (AD), which affects an estimated 26 million people worldwide, is the fourth leading cause of death among the elderly and the leading cause of dementia. Predictions are that the number of AD cases will quadruple by 2050.

Although pharmacological methods for treating AD have been discovered, none significantly delay the progression of the disease. However, cell transplantation research using animals modeled with AD has indicated that human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) can ameliorate some cognitive deficits and reduce the effects of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques, one of the physiological hallmarks of AD, comprised of peptides of 36-43 amino acids. However, the role that HUCBCs play in Aβ clearance has yet to be elucidated.

Monocytes are peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) with round nuclei that are critical components in the immune system for fighting infection and processing foreign material. A team of American, Chinese, and Japanese researchers hypothesized that monocytes derived from cord blood can help clear aggregated Aβ protein when transplanted into laboratory animals modeled with AD.

The study, using mice modeled with AD, will be published in a future issue of Cell Transplantation and is currently freely available on-line as an unedited, early e-pub at: http://ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/pre-prints/content-CT-1466_Darlington_et_al

"We previously reported that HUCBCs modulated inflammation, diminished Aβ pathology, and reduced behavioral deficits in mice modeled with AD," said study corresponding author Dr. Donna Darlington of the Rashid Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology at the Silver Child Development Center, University of South Florida. "In this study, we attempted to determine which MNC population was conferring these effects and to determine the mechanism by which these effects occur."

Over a period of two to four months, the researchers treated AD modeled mice with HUCBC-derived monocytes followed by behavioral evaluation and biochemical and histological analyses.

The researchers found that administration of HUCBC-derived monocytes not only diminished Aβ pathology in the test mice, but also improved hippocampal-dependent learning, memory, and motor function.

"MNCs may exert a therapeutic effect through phagocytosis of dead cells and cellular debris. We believe that phagocytosis (a process by which cells internalize solid particles) is a possible mechanism by which MNCs mediate Aβ clearance," said the researchers. "Most importantly, we found that aged monocytes were less effective against Aβ and that soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPPa) could restore the phagocytic capabilities of these endogenous aged cells."

"This study contributes insight into the possible mechanisms by which monocytes exert therapeutic effects," said Dr. Shinn-Zong Lin, Vice Superintendent for the Center of Neuropsychiatry, Professor of Neurosurgery at China Medical University Hospital, and Co Editor-in-Chief for Cell Transplantation. "Future studies should weigh the benefits of using MNCs in cell therapy versus the possible detrimental effects, such as secretion of neurotoxic, inflammatory factors. The effectiveness of using MNCs in human AD patients should also be validated, as it has been a matter of conjecture."
-end-
Contact: Dr. Donna Darlington, Rashid Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, Silver Child Development Center, 3515 E. Fletcher Ave. Tampa, FL, USA 33613-4704
Email: ddarling@health.usf.edu
Ph: (813) 974-5975
Fax: (813) 974-1130

Citation: Darlington, D.; Li, S.; Hou, H.; Habib, A.; Tian, J.; Gao, Y.; Ehrhart, J.; Sanberg, P.R.; Sawmiller, D.; Giunta, B.; Mori, T.; Tan, J. Human umbilical cord blood-derived monocytes improve cognitive deficits and reduce β-amyloid pathology in PSAPP mice. Cell Transplant. Appeared or available on-line: July 30, 2015The Coeditors-in-chief for CELL TRANSPLANTATION are at the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Center for Neuropsychiatry, China Medical University Hospital, TaiChung, Taiwan. Contact, Camillo Ricordi, MD at ricordi@miami.edu or Shinn-Zong Lin, MD, PhD at shinnzong@yahoo.com.tw or David Eve, PhD or Samantha Portis, MS, at celltransplantation@gmail.com

News release by Florida Science Communications http://www.sciencescribe.net

Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Related Cord Blood Articles:

Cord blood for stem cell transplant may outperform matched sibling donor
Study based on a decade of research and treatment shows no difference in overall survival between cord blood and matched related donor as source for stem cell transplant, with reduced graft-versus-host disease in patients using cord blood.
Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Trial compares maternal blood loss with immediate vs. delayed umbilical cord clamping
This randomized clinical trial compared maternal blood loss with immediate umbilical cord clamping (within 15 seconds after birth) versus delayed clamping (60 seconds after birth) in 113 women who had a scheduled cesarean delivery at term of 37 weeks or more.
Can a protein in cord blood predict risk of death, cerebral palsy in preterm infants?
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that some preterm babies born without haptoglobin, a protein in blood cells, have higher odds of brain bleeding, cerebral palsy and death.
Expanded cord blood shows potential for use in adult bone marrow transplants
Umbilical cord blood stem cells that are cultured and expanded outside the body before being used for bone marrow transplant in adult blood cancer patients appear safe and restore blood count recovery faster than standard cord blood.
Cord blood clue to respiratory diseases
New research has found children born during high pollen months may have a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases such as asthma.
Epidural stimulation shown to normalize blood pressure following spinal cord injury
Working with human research participants, researchers at the Kentucky Spinal Cord injury Research Center (KSCIRC) have found that spinal cord epidural stimulation can safely and effectively elevate blood pressure in individuals with SCI along with chronic hypotension.
Umbilical cord blood improves motor skills in some children with cerebral palsy
An infusion of cells from a child's own umbilical cord blood appears to improve brain connectivity and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy, according to a randomized clinical trial published this week by Stem Cells Translational Medicine.
Nation's public cord blood banks provide benefits, despite drop in use, study finds
More than a decade ago the federal government helped support the creation of public umbilical cord banks to collect and store a genetically diverse set of stem cells for clinical care and research.
Genetically enhanced, cord-blood derived immune cells strike B-cell cancers
Immune cells with a general knack for recognizing and killing many types of infected or abnormal cells also can be engineered to hunt down cells with specific targets on them to treat cancer, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Leukemia.
More Cord Blood News and Cord Blood Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#566 Is Your Gut Leaking?
This week we're busting the human gut wide open with Dr. Alessio Fasano from the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital. Join host Anika Hazra for our discussion separating fact from fiction on the controversial topic of leaky gut syndrome. We cover everything from what causes a leaky gut to interpreting the results of a gut microbiome test! Related links: Center for Celiac Research and Treatment website and their YouTube channel
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Flag and the Fury
How do you actually make change in the world? For 126 years, Mississippi has had the Confederate battle flag on their state flag, and they were the last state in the nation where that emblem remained "officially" flying.  A few days ago, that flag came down. A few days before that, it coming down would have seemed impossible. We dive into the story behind this de-flagging: a journey involving a clash of histories, designs, families, and even cheerleading. This show is a collaboration with OSM Audio. Kiese Laymon's memoir Heavy is here. And the Hospitality Flag webpage is here.