Nav: Home

Factors associated with longer wait times in colorectal cancer specialty care referrals

September 09, 2019

Delay in referral to specialty care for patients who have symptoms of colorectal cancer may lead to poor health outcomes. A retrospective cohort study in the Netherlands reviewed the time to specialty referral for a group of 309 patients with colorectal cancer who initially presented with symptoms to their primary care doctor. In univariable and multivariable analyses, those who initially presented with red flag symptoms, such as rectal bleeding or unintended weight loss, experienced shorter wait time than those who presented with non-alarming gastrointestinal symptoms. Univariable analysis showed that female patients and patients without a registered family history of the disease were also more likely to have a longer wait period. Of the 10% of patients with the longest wait times for referral to specialty care all patients had received an alternative initial diagnosis from their primary care physicians. These patients usually presented with conditions that obscured concern for colorectal cancer, such as hemorrhoids, fissures and inflammatory bowel disease. Initial diagnoses were not always reconsidered when complaints persisted and follow-up consultations were sometimes omitted.

The study points to a relationship between long time to referral of colorectal cancer in primary care and low cancer suspicion. There is potential for reducing longest times to referral of colorectal cancer patients in primary care by earlier reconsideration of the initial hypothesis and implementing strict follow-up consultations.
-end-
Potential for Reducing Time to Referral for Colorectal Cancer Patients in Primary Care
Nicole van Erp, MD, et al
University Medical Centre Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, The Netherlands

American Academy of Family Physicians

Related Colorectal Cancer Articles:

Colorectal cancer rates in Canada
The incidence of colorectal cancer among younger adults increased in recent years in this analysis of data from Canadian national cancer registries that included about 688,000 new colorectal cancers diagnosed over more than 40 years.
Cancer drugs promote stem cell properties of colorectal cancer
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) and the Mannheim University Medical Center have now discovered that a certain group of cancer drugs (MEK Inhibitors) activates the cancer-promoting Wnt signalling pathway in colorectal cancer cells.
Aspirin before at-home colorectal cancer screening test didn't significantly improve ability to detect cancer precursors
Some observational studies have suggested that taking aspirin before undergoing colorectal cancer screening with a fecal immunochemical test for blood in stool might improve the ability of the test to detect cancer precursors.
Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer
Rare mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer.
Bug that causes stomach cancer could play a role in colorectal cancer
A bacterium known for causing stomach cancer might also increase the risk of certain colorectal cancers, particularly among African Americans, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.
More Colorectal Cancer News and Colorectal Cancer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...