SNM applauds FDA's decision to approve Zevalin

September 10, 2009

RESTON, Va.--SNM applauds the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) recent decision to approve the radioimmunotherapy (RIT) drug, Zevalin, as a front-line treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).

"This is welcome news for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma," said Michael M. Graham, M.D., Ph.D., president of SNM and director of nuclear medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. "We've known for some time that RIT works extremely well for many NHL patients. With the FDA's approval, more patients can take advantage of this promising treatment sooner rather than later, giving them more hope for a brighter future."

This is the first time that the drug has been approved as an effective treatment option at the time of onset of lymphoma. Previously, Zevalin was approved only to treat lymphoma after a relapse, or after all conventional therapies failed. Now, patients with NHL can reap the same benefits earlier on in the disease, before it progresses to a more serious stage.

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma--one of the two main types of lymphoma--has many different forms and is the fifth most common cancer in the United States. When lymphoma is first diagnosed, treatment choices depend on the cell type, extent of disease and rate of progression. New and emerging molecular imaging therapies, such as RIT, continue to provide major breakthroughs for patients with NHL by allowing tailored treatments at the molecular level. RIT is a more highly targeted therapy than traditional treatments because molecular imaging techniques and therapies can pinpoint the exact location of disease and deliver a tumor-killing dose of a radioactive substance directly to the cancer cells while sparing healthy cells.

"New developments in molecular imaging technologies are dramatically improving the ways in which lymphoma is diagnosed and treated," says Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D., professor of radiology, clinical pharmacy and biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine. "Research in molecular imaging is also contributing to our understanding of lymphoma and helping to direct more effective care of patients with the disease."
-end-
About SNM--Advancing Molecular Imaging and Therapy

SNM is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about what molecular imaging is and how it can help provide patients with the best health care possible. SNM members specialize in molecular imaging, a vital element of today's medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated.

SNM's more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit www.snm.org.

Society of Nuclear Medicine

Related Lymphoma Articles from Brightsurf:

Oncotarget: An integrative microenvironment approach for follicular lymphoma
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 33 features Figure 8, ''Haplotype estimates in follicular lymphoma patients,'' by Assis-Mendonça, et al. which reported that the authors tested associations between SNPs, clinicopathological features and TME composition, and proposed survival models in R-CHOP/R-CVP-treated patients.

Novel Radioimmunotherapy Reverses Resistance to Commonly Used Lymphoma Drug
A new radioimmunotherapy has proven effective in reversing resistance to the most commonly used lymphoma drug, rituximab, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

A new immunotherapeutic agent for children and adolescents with advanced lymphoma
The excellent results of the phase III international paediatric study, Inter-B-NHL ritux 2010, have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Lymphoma's different route revealed
Researchers at the MDC observe the very early stages of blood vessel development in lymph node tumors.

Old weapon, new target: Dasatinib against angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown by in vivo experimentation on a mouse model that angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma is highly dependent on T-Cell Receptor Signaling.

Suspect eliminated as a therapeutic target in B cell lymphoma
Australian researchers have narrowed the focus on which survival proteins are important for the survival of B cell lymphomas, eliminating the protein BCL-W from the 'suspect list'.

New factor in the development of childhood lymphoma
The immune system is highly complex and a detailed understanding of many underlying mechanisms is still lacking.

Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma
New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma.

Association of BRCA2 mutations with risk of childhood lymphoma
This research letter reports on the association of BRCA2 gene mutations and potential risk for pediatric or adolescent lymphoma.

Why Hodgkin's lymphoma cells grow uncontrollably
Although classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is generally easily treatable today, many aspects of the disease still remain a mystery.

Read More: Lymphoma News and Lymphoma Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.