The current state of transradial access

September 10, 2018

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 149-162(14); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0032 Jennifer A. Rymer and Sunil V. Rao from the Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, USA consider the current state of transradial access.

The adoption of transradial access in the United States and internationally has been growing over the past few years. In the population of patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, particularly ST-elevation myocardial infarction, transradial access has the benefit of fewer vascular and bleeding complications and lower mortality rates over transfemo-ral access. We will examine the current evidence supporting transradial access for several patient populations, including those patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. We will review the literature regarding the learning curve for transradial access with new operators, as well as experienced transfemoral operators new to transradial access. Finally, we will investigate the role of transradial access in same-day discharge for stable patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.
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Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications

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