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Europeans face significant challenges to participate in lung cancer clinical trials

September 10, 2019

Barcelona--A survey of patients with lung cancer in several European countries revealed that half did not know what a cancer clinical trial is, and 22 percent had never heard of a cancer clinical trial. The research was reported by Dr. A.M. Baird, on behalf of Lung Cancer Europe, today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.

Lung Cancer Europe (LuCE) is the voice of people impacted by lung cancer in Europe. LuCE aims to increase knowledge of lung cancer and provide a platform to raise awareness about disparities in detection, diagnosis, treatment and care across Europe.

Dr. Baird reported that the study was undertaken to gain a better insight into the clinical trial experience from a patient perspective and improve clinicians' and public health's understanding of patients' awareness and attitudes towards clinical trials.

The LuCE team developed the survey and qualitative interview questions based on a review of relevant literature and policy sources.

"We shared our online survey with lung cancer advocates and patients with lung cancer," Dr. Baird said. The organization conducted qualitative interviews with 15 individuals, covering the medical community, representatives from patient advocate organizations and the pharmaceutical industry.

The survey was shared with patients with lung cancer across Europe and those who took part resided mostly in Poland (19.5 percent), Italy (18.7 percent), Denmark (9.9percent) and Spain (9.2 percent).

"Fortunately, over 50 percent of these respondents stated that their trial experience was positive and 80 percent wanted to find out more about clinical trials, while 75 percent believed that it would be beneficial for patients to work together with researchers in the clinical trial development process," she said.

Survey respondents identified several barriers to accessing lung cancer clinical trials, including difficulties in cross-border access, language barriers, lack of accurate accessible information, lack of awareness by patients and clinicians and disparities in access across Europe.

"The lung cancer community must work together to overcome these barriers and ensure access to clinical trials for all people impacted by lung cancer," Baird concluded.
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About the WCLC:

The WCLC is the world's largest meeting dedicated to lung cancer and other thoracic malignancies, attracting more than 7,000 researchers, physicians and specialists from more than 100 countries. The goal is to increase awareness, collaboration and understanding of lung cancer, and to help participants implement the latest developments across the globe. The conference will cover a wide range of disciplines and unveil several research studies and clinical trial results. For more information, visit wclc2019.iaslc.org.

About the IASLC:

The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) is the only global organization dedicated solely to the study of lung cancer and other thoracic malignancies. Founded in 1974, the association's membership includes more than 7,500 lung cancer specialists across all disciplines in over 100 countries, forming a global network working together to conquer lung and thoracic cancers worldwide. The association also publishes the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the primary educational and informational publication for topics relevant to the prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment of all thoracic malignancies. Visit http://www.iaslc.org for more information.

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

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