Human remains discovered in search for King Richard III

September 11, 2012

A team from the University of Leicester is today (Wednesday September 12) announcing a dramatic development in the search for King Richard III.

The search, which has entered a third week, has uncovered evidence of human remains - the first time in the search that this is disclosed.

The University of Leicester is leading the archaeological search for the burial place of King Richard III with Leicester City Council, in association with the Richard III Society.

Over the past two weeks, the team has made major discoveries about the heritage of Leicester by: The search team, popularly dubbed the Time Tomb Team, has now excavated the choir of the Grey Friars church - believed to be where King Richard III was buried - and has made some stunning discoveries. The dig is being filmed by Darlow Smithson Productions for a forthcoming Channel 4 documentary to be aired later this year.

Richard Taylor, Director of Corporate Affairs at the University of Leicester and one of the prime movers behind the project, said: "What we have uncovered is truly remarkable and today (Wednesday September 12) we will be announcing to the world that the search for King Richard III has taken a dramatic new turn."

Leicester's City Mayor Peter Soulsby said: "This discovery adds a whole new dimension to a search which has already far exceeded our expectations. This is exciting news and I know that people across the world will be waiting to hear more about the University's find."

Philippa Langley from the Richard III Society said: "We came with a dream and if the dream becomes reality it will be nothing short of miraculous."
-end-
A press conference is being held at 11am on Wednesday September 12 at The Guildhall, Guildhall Lane, Leicester LE1 5FQ

Media must notify pressoffice@le.ac.uk in advance of attendance.

Media resources (including images and background to the dig) available at: http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/media-centre/richard-iii

Interviews: Richard Taylor, Director of Corporate Affairs, University of Leicester, will be available for interview via University of Leicester press office:

0116 252 2415

07711 927821

pressoffice@le.ac.uk

University of Leicester

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