Journal of Medical Imaging will launch in 2014

September 12, 2013

BELLINGHAM, Washington, USA - 12 September 2013 - In early 2014, SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, will launch the Journal of Medical Imaging (JMI), covering fundamental and translational research and applications focused on photonics in medical imaging.

The scope of JMI initially will mirror that of the annual SPIE Medical Imaging symposium. Topics will include imaging physics, tomographic reconstruction algorithms (such as those in CT and MRI), image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, visualization and modeling, image perception and observer performance, technology assessment, ultrasonic imaging, image-guided procedures and digital pathology.

"The new journal gives the field of medical imaging, which continues to be more and more interdisciplinary, a home for scientific presentation, discussion, review and archiving," said Dr. Maryellen Giger, A.N. Pritzker Professor of Radiology/Medical Physics at the University of Chicago, who has been appointed editor-in-chief.

Authors are invited to submit articles beginning 1 October 2013, with publication to begin in early 2014. More information is at http://www.spie.org/JMI.

JMI will be published in print quarterly and online in the SPIE Digital Library as each peer-reviewed article is approved for publication, with the online version freely available to all readers in the first year.

"The medical imaging community has a long association with SPIE through the annual symposium the Society has hosted for more than 40 years," noted SPIE President Bill Arnold. "Applications of these technologies have helped save lives through better diagnosis and less invasive treatments, and the field keeps expanding to meet more needs. Supporting the community with a home journal is a significant step forward."

"SPIE is delighted to be able to respond to the needs expressed by the medical imaging community, in particular authors who currently participate in the Medical Imaging symposium. The new journal will provide them a rigorous, peer-reviewed option for their work and help maintain and foster the already well-established connections within the community," said SPIE Publications Director Eric Pepper.

Because it is open to submissions internationally, JMI will also serve to strengthen connections and facilitate collaboration among researchers in academia, medical institutions, industry, and government labs throughout the larger imaging community, Giger said.
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SPIE is the international society for optics and photonics, a not-for-profit organization founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. The Society serves nearly 235,000 constituents from approximately 155 countries, offering conferences, continuing education, books, journals, and a digital library in support of interdisciplinary information exchange, professional networking, and patent precedent. SPIE provided over $3.2 million in support of education and outreach programs in 2012.

SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

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