World leaders seek cure for a pain in the neck

September 13, 2005

Professor Gwendolen Jull and Dr Michele Sterling of the UQ Division of Physiotherapy are conducting two clinical trials investigating recovery following a whiplash injury.

One trial is examining whether a multi-professional treatment approach is necessary following a whiplash injury. The other trial is examining the progression of symptoms following a whiplash injury.

Whiplash injury is commonly associated with neck pain, impaired movement and can be distressing.

Professor Jull said: "The results of the current research will add to the understanding of whiplash injury, which will ultimately assist in the assessment and best management of whiplash."

Both Professor Jull and Dr Sterling have extensive experience in treating patients with Acute Whiplash Injury.

Volunteers who have neck pain as a result of a motor vehicle accident which has occurred within the past four weeks, and who are aged between 18 and 65 years of age are required for the current research.

Participants will attend the whiplash clinic at the University's St Lucia campus for four testing sessions of approximately two hours each over a 12 month period.

A range of physical tests examining neck function will be conducted during each appointment. Participants will also be asked to complete a series of questionnaires which will help to identify the range and severity of symptoms, as well as establish how whiplash injury affects patient's everyday lives.
-end-
To volunteer or for further information please contact Brad Sanderson or Kathy Francis on +61 7 3365 4529, or email acutewhiplashresearch@shrs.uq.edu.au

Research Australia

Related Whiplash Articles from Brightsurf:

Alarming abusive head trauma revealed in computational simulation impact study
Abusive head trauma (AHT), like that of Shaken Baby Syndrome, is the leading cause of fatal brain injuries in children under two.

Salmon lose diversity in managed rivers, reducing resilience to environmental change
The manipulation of rivers in California is jeopardizing the resilience of native Chinook salmon.

Researchers of the UMA analyze the role of kinesiophobia in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain
Finding out how kinesiophobia -- unreasonable fear of movement -- may affect individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain is the aim of a research group of the University of Malaga, which recent studies have been published in the scientific journal British Journal of Sports Medicine, the world's No.

Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients
A Columbia Engineering-designed robotic brace that supports the neck during its natural motion is the first device shown to dramatically assist ALS patients in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion.

Questions in quantum computing: How to move electrons with light
To design future quantum technologies, scientists pinpoint how microwaves interact with matter.

Future impacts of El Niño, La Niña likely to intensify
When an El Niño or its opposite, La Niña, forms in the future, it's likely to cause more intense impacts over many land regions -- amplifying changes to temperature, precipitation and wildfire risk.

Cockpit protection (halo) to boost racing driver safety may affect steering accuracy
The cockpit protection system fitted to racing cars, known as halo, may affect the driver's head position and motion, possibly compromising steering accuracy, suggest the results of a simulation test, using a similar structure, and published in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

Northeast farmers weigh warming climate, drenched fields
Farmers in the Northeast are adapting to longer growing seasons and warming climate conditions -- but they may face spring-planting whiplash as they confront fields increasingly saturated with rain, according to a research paper published in the journal Climatic Change.

One wet winter can shake up San Francisco Bay's invasive species
For many Californians, last year's wet winter triggered a case of whiplash.

The fastest light-driven current source
Controlling electronic current is essential to modern electronics, as data and signals are transferred by streams of electrons which are controlled at high speed.

Read More: Whiplash News and Whiplash Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.