Nav: Home

Smoking may lead to heart failure by thickening the heart wall

September 13, 2016

DALLAS, Sept. 13, 2016 -- Smoking is associated with thicker heart walls and reduction in the heart's pumping ability, two factors associated with increased risk of heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

The study, conducted in participants of average age 75.7 and no obvious signs of cardiovascular disease, also found that higher rates of cumulative cigarette exposure -- measure of how much and how long people have smoked during their lifetime -- were associated with greater heart damage. Studies have long established that smoking leads to heart attacks and is associated with heart failure even in people without cardiovascular disease. However, none have found a clear mechanism by which tobacco may increase the risk of heart failure.

"These data suggest that smoking can independently lead to thickening of the heart and worsening of heart function, which may lead to a higher risk for heart failure, even in people who don't have heart attacks," said Wilson Nadruz Jr, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study and research fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

"In addition, the more people smoke, the greater the damage to the heart's structure and function, which reinforces the recommendations stating that smoking is dangerous and should be stopped."

The study examined data from 4,580 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study who underwent an echocardiogram. Even after accounting for factors such as age, race, body mass index, blood pressure, diabetes and alcohol consumption, current smokers had thicker heart walls and reduced pumping function, compared with nonsmokers and former smokers.

"The good news is that former smokers had similar heart structure and function compared with never smokers," said Scott Solomon, M.D., senior study author and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. "This suggests that the potential effects of tobacco on the myocardium might be reversible after smoking cessation."
-end-
Other co-authors are Brian Claggett, Ph.D.; Alexandra Gonçalves, M.D., Ph.D.; Gabriela Querejeta-Roca, M.D.; Miguel M. Fernandes-Silva, M.D., Ph.D.; Amil M. Shah, M.D., M.P.H.; Susan Cheng, M.D., M.P.H.; Hirofumi Tanaka, Ph.D.; Gerardo Heiss, M.D., Ph.D. and Dalane W. Kitzman, M.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute supported the study.

Additional Resources:

Smoking photos and heart graphic are located in the right column of this release link http://newsroom.heart.org/news/smoking-may-lead-to-heart-failure-by-thickening-the-heart-wall?preview=b39bb0bf26ff8ff21485837e1768a935

After Sept. 13 view the manuscript online.
Follow AHA/ASA news on Twitter @HeartNews.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

American Heart Association

Related Heart Failure Articles:

New hope for treating heart failure
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers.
Activated T-cells drive post-heart attack heart failure
Chronic inflammation after a heart attack can promote heart failure and death.
ICU care for COPD, heart failure and heart attack may not be better
Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit?
Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer.
Smoking may lead to heart failure by thickening the heart wall
Smokers without obvious signs of heart disease were more likely than nonsmokers and former smokers to have thickened heart walls and reduced heart pumping ability.
After the heart attack: Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure (video)
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells in the heart.
Heart failure after first heart attack may increase cancer risk
People who develop heart failure after their first heart attack have a greater risk of developing cancer when compared to first-time heart attack survivors without heart failure, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Scientists use 'virtual heart' to model heart failure
A team of researchers have created a detailed computational model of the electrophysiology of congestive heart failure, a leading cause of death.
Increase in biomarker linked with increased risk of heart disease, heart failure, death
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Elizabeth Selvin, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, and colleagues examined the association of six-year change in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T with incident coronary heart disease, heart failure and all-cause mortality.
1 in 4 patients develop heart failure within 4 years of first heart attack
One in four patients develop heart failure within four years of a first heart attack, according to a study in nearly 25,000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr.

Related Heart Failure Reading:

Heart Failure: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease
by Douglas L. Mann MD (Author), G. Michael Felker MD MHS FACC FAHA (Author)

Oxford Textbook of Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation (Oxford Textbooks in Cardiology)
by Michael Domanski (Editor), Mandeep R. Mehra (Editor), Marc Pfeffer (Editor)

The 4 Stages of Heart Failure
by Brian Jaski (Author)

Heart Failure: A Comprehensive Guide to Pathophysiology and Clinical Care
by Howard Eisen (Editor)

Heart Failure (Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology)
by Johann Bauersachs (Editor), Javed Butler (Editor), Peter Sandner (Editor)

Heart Failure Pocketcard Set
by M.D. Szady (Author), M.D. Bavry (Author)

Living Well with Heart Failure, the Misnamed, Misunderstood Condition
by Edward K. Kasper (Author), Mary Knudson (Author)

Heart Failure: A Practical Guide for Diagnosis and Management (Oxford American Cardiology Library)
by Stuart Katz (Author), Ragavendra Baliga (Series Editor)

Heart Failure
by Thomas Nelson

100 Questions & Answers About Congestive Heart Failure (100 Questions and Answers About...)
by Campion E. Quinn (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Hacking The Law
We have a vision of justice as blind, impartial, and fair — but in reality, the law often fails those who need it most. This hour, TED speakers explore radical ways to change the legal system. Guests include lawyer and social justice advocate Robin Steinberg, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise, political activist Brett Hennig, and lawyer and social entrepreneur Vivek Maru.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#495 Earth Science in Space
Some worlds are made of sand. Some are made of water. Some are even made of salt. In science fiction and fantasy, planet can be made of whatever you want. But what does that mean for how the planets themselves work? When in doubt, throw an asteroid at it. This is a live show recorded at the 2018 Dragon Con in Atlanta Georgia. Featuring Travor Valle, Mika McKinnon, David Moscato, Scott Harris, and moderated by our own Bethany Brookshire. Note: The sound isn't as good as we'd hoped but we love the guests and the conversation and we wanted to...