Nav: Home

NASA sees Hurricane Jose in between Bahamas and Bermuda

September 13, 2017

NASA's Terra satellite is one of many satellites keeping a close eye on Hurricane Jose and saw the storm between the Bahamas and Bermuda.

On Sept. 12 at 1:35 p.m. EDT (15:35 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Jose. In the image, Jose appeared somewhat elongated as a result of vertical wind shear affecting the storm.

At 5 a.m. AST/EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Hurricane Jose was located near 26.1 degrees north latitude and 66.0 degrees west longitude. That's about 505 miles (810 Km) east-northeast of the southeastern Bahamas and 435 miles (700 km) south of Bermuda. Jose was moving toward the southeast near 8 mph (13 km/h), but it is expected to make a slow clockwise loop during the next 36 to 48 hours, moving west-northwestward by late Thursday, Sept. 14. Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph (120 kph) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours. The estimated minimum central pressure is 985 millibars.

An animation of NOAA's GOES East satellite imagery from Sept. 11 at 8:15 a.m. EDT (1215 UTC) to Sept. 13 ending at 8:30 a.m. EDT (1230 UTC) was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. NOAA manages the GOES series of satellites and NASA/NOAA GOES Project uses the data to create images and animations.

The animation showed Hurricane Jose as it continued making a loop in the Atlantic Ocean between Bermuda and the Bahamas and Post-Tropical Cyclone Irma moved north and weakened to a remnant low pressure area centered over southeastern Missouri.

National Hurricane Center forecaster Jack Beven said that Jose continues to be affected by 20-25 knots of northerly vertical wind shear, and a recent overpass from the GMI instrument aboard NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite shows that the low-level center is at the northern edge of the large area of thunderstorms.
-end-
For updates on Jose, visit: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Satellites Articles:

Scientists use satellites to count endangered birds from space
Albatrosses, one of the most iconic but also one of the most threatened groups of birds on the planet, are difficult to study in part because they breed on some of the world's remotest and most inaccessible islands.
How low can you go? New project to bring satellites nearer to Earth
The University of Manchester is leading a multi-million pound project to develop satellites which will orbit much closer to the Earth -- making them smaller, cheaper, helping to dodge space debris and improving the quality of images they can send back.
Satellites help discover a jet stream in the Earth's core
A jet stream within the Earth's molten iron core has been discovered by scientists using the latest satellite data that helps create an 'X-ray' view of the planet.
What satellites can tell us about how animals will fare in a changing climate
From the Arctic to the Mojave Desert, terrestrial and marine habitats are quickly changing.
These tiny satellites could take on NASA's riskiest missions (video)
At the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, Calif., NASA is preparing tiny satellites the size of briefcases for a mission to Mars.
Students experience 'NASA Satellites 101'
Astronauts aren't the only ones who get to use NASA technology.
Satellites to see Mercury enter spotlight on May 9
It happens only a little more than once a decade and the next chance to see it is Monday, May 9, 2016.
Satellites find sustainable energy in cities
Underground heat islands in cities have an enormous geothermal potential.
NOAA's GOES-S, T and U satellites are shaping up
As NOAA's GOES-R satellite goes through mechanical testing in preparation for launch in October 2016, the remaining satellites in the series (GOES-S, T, and U) are also making significant progress.
NTU Singapore successfully launches its fifth and sixth satellites
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, successfully launched two satellites: a climate monitoring and navigation satellite, and the university's first satellite with a commercial payload.

Related Satellites Reading:

Satellite Basics For Everyone: An Illustrated Guide to Satellites for Non-Technical and Technical People
by C. Robert Welti (Author)

Learn about satellites that affect us every day, how they work, and how we can place and keep them on orbit. Satellite Basics for Everyone presents an introduction and overview to satellites. It's written as clearly and understand View Details


Eye in the Sky: The Story of the Corona Spy Satellites (Smithsonian History of Aviation and Spaceflight (Paperback))
by Dwayne A. Day (Author)

Presenting the full story of the CORONA spy satellites' origins, Eye in the Sky explores the Cold War technology and far-reaching effects of the satellites on foreign policy and national security. Arguing that satellite reconnaissance was key to shaping the course of the Cold War, the book documents breakthroughs in intelligence gathering and achievements in space technology that rival the landing on the moon. View Details


Spy Satellite Manual (Owners' Workshop Manual)
by David Baker (Author)

In 1954, three years before the launch of Sputnik 1, the world’s first satellite, top-secret discussions were held in the United States to plan the development of military spy satellites, designed to obtain detailed photography of the Soviet Union’s military strength, and its potential for waging nuclear war. This book takes a detailed look at the programmes which resulted from the clandestine decision in the US to build highly secret spy satellites in parallel with civilian space plans, revealing for the first time previously classified details of the design and layout of photographic... View Details


Earth Satellites (Space Tech)
by Allan Morey (Author)

It was an Earth satellite that started the space race between Russia and the United States. Russia sent Sputnik 1 into space in 1957, and the U.S. responded with Explorer 1 in 1958. In this high-interest title, reluctant readers will learn all about the machines that first signaled the space age. View Details


Satellites - Acting Edition
by Diana Son (Author)

Paperback View Details


Artificial Satellites (Pogo: Space Explorers)
by Jenny Fretland VanVoorst (Author)

In Artificial Satellites, early fluent readers learn about the construction and function of a variety of artificial satellites. Vibrant, full-color photos and carefully leveled text engage young readers as they learn about the fascinating man-made objects orbiting our planet. View Details


Space Systems Failures: Disasters and Rescues of Satellites, Rocket and Space Probes (Springer Praxis Books)
by David M. Harland (Author), Ralph Lorenz (Author)

The very first book on space systems failures written from an engineering perspective.

Focuses on the causes of the failures and discusses how the engineering knowledge base has been enhanced by the lessons learned.

Discusses non-fatal anomalies which do not affect the ultimate success of a mission, but which are failures nevertheless.

Describes engineering aspects of the spacecraft, making this a valuable complementary reference work to conventional engineering texts.

View Details


Spy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies that Changed History
by Thomas Graham Jr. (Author), Keith Hansen (Author), Robert Huffstutler (Introduction)

Much has been said and written about the failure of U.S. intelligence to prevent the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, and its overestimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction under Saddam Hussein. This book focuses instead on the central role that intelligence-collection systems play in promoting arms control and disarmament.

Ambassador Thomas Graham Jr. and Keith Hansen bring more than fifty combined years of experience to this discussion of the capabilities of technical systems, which are primarily based in space. Their history of the rapid advancement of surveillance... View Details


Satellites in the High Country: Searching for the Wild in the Age of Man
by Jason Mark (Author)

In New Mexico's Gila Wilderness, 106 Mexican gray wolves may be some of the most monitored wildlife on the planet. Collared, microchipped, and transported by helicopter, the wolves are protected and confined in an attempt to appease ranchers and conservationists alike. Once a symbol of the wild, these wolves have come to illustrate the demise of wilderness in this Human Age, where man's efforts shape life in even the most remote corners of the earth. And yet, the howl of an unregistered wolf—half of a rogue pair—splits the night. If you know where to look, you'll find that much remains... View Details


20th Century Spy in the Sky Satellites: Secrets of the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) Volume 3 - SAMOS and the NASA Lunar Orbiter Program
by National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) (Author), U.S. Military (Author), Department of Defense (Author), World Spaceflight News (Author)

Part of our comprehensive series on the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) and its "spy satellite" network, this volume covers the SAMOS satellite camera system and the incredible story of NASA's use of the camera in its highly successful Lunar Orbiter moon mapping program. The previously classified documents in this collection were released by the NRO in September 2011 as part of its 50th anniversary. In declassifying these fascinating documents, the NRO has opened the curtain to show the tremendous challenges that were overcome to achieve the impressive successes that help win the Cold... View Details

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

The Big Five
What are the five biggest global challenges we face right now — and what can we do about them? This hour, TED speakers explore some radical solutions to these enduring problems. Guests include geoengineer Tim Kruger, president of the International Rescue Committee David Miliband, political scientist Ian Bremmer, global data analyst Sarah Menker, and historian Rutger Bregman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#457 Trowel Blazing
This week we look at some of the lesser known historical figures and current public perception of anthropology, archaeology, and other fields that end in "ology". Rebecca Wragg Sykes, an archaeologist, writer, and co-founder of the TrowelBlazers, tells us about the Raising Horizons project and how their team is trying to shine the spotlight on the forgotten historical women of archaeological, geological, and palaeontological science. And Kristina Killgrove, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of West Florida and science writer, talks about the public perception of the fields of anthropology and archeology, and how those science are represented -...