Nav: Home

NASA's GPM sees Typhoon Talim threatening islands of Japan

September 13, 2017

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the heavy rainfall occurring in Typhoon Talim in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The GPM core observatory satellite scanned the western side of Typhoon Talim on September 13, 2017 at 0216 UTC (Sept. 12 at 10:16 p.m. EDT). GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument collected data showing that Talim was a large typhoon that was producing heavy precipitation. GMI showed that intense bands of storms wrapping around the center of the typhoon were dropping rain at a rate of over 76 mm/hour.

GPM's Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) only scanned the western and southwestern side of the typhoon. DPR found that a few powerful storms in a feeder band well south of the storm's center were dropping rain at a rate of over 120 mm/hour. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on Sept. 13, Typhoon Talim had maximum sustained winds near 75 knots (86.3 mph/139 kph). It was located near 25.0 degrees north latitude and 125.7 degrees east longitude. That's about 145 miles southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa Island, Japan. Talim was moving to the northwest at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) predicts that Typhoon Talim will intensify as it moves to the west-northwest. Environmental conditions such as low vertical wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures are favorable for Talim's intensification. Talim's winds are expected to increase to a peak of 115 knots as it re-curves toward the Japanese island of Kyushu.

-end-



NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Typhoon Articles:

NASA sees Typhoon Sarika approaching second landfall
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at Typhoon Sarika as it was poised for its second of three expected landfalls.
NASA sees the closing eye of Typhoon Chaba
NASA satellite imagery showed that Typhoon Chaba's eye had closed as the storm weakened between Oct.
NASA sees Chaba intensifying to a super typhoon
As Typhoon Chaba moved to the western Pacific Ocean south of Okinawa over the past few days wind speeds have increased.
NASA sees Typhoon Lionrock approaching Japan
Tropical Storm Lionrock continued crawling toward the main island of Honshu, Japan, as NASA's Aqua and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellites passed overhead and gathered data on the storm.
Typhoon Lionrock threatening Japan
Depending on the intensity track of Typhoon Lionrock, it could pass over Japan with the strength of a lion or or the weakness of a lamb.
Typhoon Lionrock's intensification seen by NASA's GPM
Typhoon Lionrock's rainfall rates and cloud heights were analyzed as it continued to intensify when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead.
NASA sees Lionrock strengthen into a typhoon
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Typhoon Lionrock as it strengthened to a typhoon east of Japan's Ryukyu Islands.
NASA sees Typhoon Nida make landfall
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon Nida shortly after it made landfall just north of Hong Kong.
NASA's GPM finds extreme rainfall in Typhoon In-fa
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission known as GPM passed over Typhoon In-fa and found extreme rainfall occurring in the storm.
NASA's Terra satellite sees Typhoon In-fa stretching
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon In-fa on Nov. 23 and imagery showed the storm had become elongated to the northeast.

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Oliver Sipple
One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple's split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Future Consequences
From data collection to gene editing to AI, what we once considered science fiction is now becoming reality. This hour, TED speakers explore the future consequences of our present actions. Guests include designer Anab Jain, futurist Juan Enriquez, biologist Paul Knoepfler, and neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris.