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Inferno world with titanium skies

September 13, 2017

A team of astronomers led by Elyar Sedaghati, an ESO fellow and recent graduate of TU Berlin, has examined the atmosphere of the exoplanet [WASP-19b] in greater detail than ever before. This remarkable planet has about the same mass as Jupiter, but is so close to its parent star that it completes an orbit in just 19 hours and its atmosphere is estimated to have a temperature of about 2000 degrees Celsius.

As WASP-19b passes in front of its parent star, some of the starlight passes through the planet's atmosphere and leaves subtle fingerprints in the light that eventually reaches Earth. By using the FORS2 instrument on the Very Large Telescope the team was able to carefully analyse this light and deduce that the atmosphere contained small amounts of titanium oxide, water and traces of sodium, alongside a strongly scattering global haze.

"Detecting such molecules is, however, no simple feat," explains Elyar Sedaghati, who spent 2 years as ESO student to work on this project. "Not only do we need data of exceptional quality, but we also need to perform a sophisticated analysis. We used an algorithm that explores many millions of spectra spanning a wide range of chemical compositions, temperatures, and cloud or haze properties in order to draw our conclusions."

Titanium oxide is rarely seen on Earth. It is known to exist in the atmospheres of cool stars. In the atmospheres of hot planets like WASP-19b, it acts as a heat absorber. If present in large enough quantities, these molecules prevent heat from entering or escaping through the atmosphere, leading to a thermal inversion -- the temperature is higher in the upper atmosphere and lower further down, the opposite of the normal situation. Ozone plays a similar role in Earth's atmosphere, where it causes inversion in the stratosphere.

"The presence of titanium oxide in the atmosphere of WASP-19b can have substantial effects on the atmospheric temperature structure and circulation." explains Ryan MacDonald, another team member and an astronomer at Cambridge University, United Kingdom. "To be able to examine exoplanets at this level of detail is promising and very exciting." adds Nikku Madhusudhan from Cambridge University who oversaw the theoretical interpretation of the observations.

The astronomers collected observations of WASP-19b over a period of more than one year. By measuring the relative variations in the planet's radius at different wavelengths of light that passed through the exoplanet's atmosphere and comparing the observations to atmospheric models, they could extrapolate different properties, such as the chemical content, of the exoplanet's atmosphere.

This new information about the presence of metal oxides like titanium oxide and other substances will allow much better modeling of exoplanet atmospheres. Looking to the future, once astronomers are able to observe atmospheres of possibly habitable planets, the improved models will give them a much better idea of how to interpret those observations.

"This important discovery is the outcome of a refurbishment of the FORS2 instrument that was done exactly for this purpose," adds team member Henri Boffin, from ESO, who led the refurbishment project. "Since then, FORS2 has become the best instrument to perform this kind of study from the ground."
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More information

This research was presented in the paper entitled "Detection of titanium oxide in the atmosphere of a hot Jupiter" by Elyar Sedaghati et. al. to appear in Nature.

The team is composed of Elyar Sedaghati (ESO; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Germany; and TU Berlin, Germany), Henri M.J. Boffin (ESO), Ryan J. MacDonald (Cambridge University, UK), Siddharth Gandhi (Cambridge University, UK), Nikku Madhusudhan (Cambridge University, UK), Neale P. Gibson (Queen's University Belfast, UK), Mahmoudreza Oshagh (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany), Antonio Claret (Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía - CSIC, Spain) and Heike Rauer (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Germany and TU Berlin, Germany).

ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope and its world-leading Very Large Telescope Interferometer as well as two survey telescopes, VISTA working in the infrared and the visible-light VLT Survey Telescope. ESO is also a major partner in two facilities on Chajnantor, APEX and ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre Extremely Large Telescope, the ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

Links

* Research paper in Nature - https://www.eso.org/public/archives/releases/sciencepapers/eso1729/eso1729a.pdf

* Photos of ESO's Very Large Telescope - http://www.eso.org/public/images/archive/search/?ranking=0&fov=0&release_id=&minimum_size=0&description=&published_until_year=0&published_until_month=0&title=&subject_name=Very+Large+Telescope&credit=&published_until_day=0&published_since_day=0&published_since_month=0&id=&published_since_year=0

Contacts

Elyar Sedaghati
ESO Fellow
Vitacura, Santiago, Chile
Tel: +56 2 2463 6537
Email: esedagha@eso.org

Henri Boffin
ESO
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel: +49 89 3200 6542
Email: hboffin@eso.org

Richard Hook
ESO Public Information Officer
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel: +49 89 3200 6655
Cell: +49 151 1537 3591
Email: rhook@eso.org

ESO

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