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Are differences in working memory development associated with crashes involving young drivers?

September 13, 2019

What The Study Did: This study of 84 young drivers looked at the association between motor vehicle crashes and differences in the development of working memory, which is critical to awareness of hazards while driving.

Authors: Elizabeth A. Walshe, Ph.D., of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, is the corresponding author.

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.11421)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Wednesday and Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

JAMA Network Open

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