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Study examines patterns of violence among young urban males

September 13, 2019

Bottom Line: This observational study of adolescent men in urban neighborhoods examined associations between social support, patterns of violence, and violence-related risk behaviors or protective factors that might mitigate them. The analysis included data from a recently completed randomized clinical trial that included 866 male adolescents from lower-resource neighborhoods in Pittsburgh who were enrolled at community agencies. Participants were surveyed on issues including violence, bullying, sexual and dating violence, substance use and involvement in school. The authors report that a high level of social support was associated with fewer risk behaviors among young people, and high social support and mentoring were both associated with a lower likelihood of being involved in a gang. The results suggest understanding the associations between different types of violence and their related risk and protective factors may help in prevention efforts. A limitation of the study was that it was conducted in urban neighborhoods in a single city, which may limit its generalizability to other communities.

Authors: Alison J. Culyba, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.11375)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Alison J. Culyba, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., email Arvind Suresh at suresha2@upmc.edu">suresha2@upmc.edu. The full study and commentary are linked to this news release.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Wednesday and Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

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