Nav: Home

UW-Madison tools help track Hurricane Ophelia

September 14, 2005

As Hurricane Ophelia is set to make landfall on the North Carolina coast on Wednesday or Thursday (Sept. 14 or 15), analysis techniques developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Tropical Cyclones group in the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies are helping to predict the anticipated path of the storm.

Since 1982, the Tropical Cyclones group has been developing specialized tools used by forecasters with weather satellite data using its Man computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS). The group forges techniques of use to forecasters, and for any major tropical storm its Web site transfers large amounts of data to researchers, forecasters and the general public. (During Hurricane Katrina, the site experienced 1.8 million hits.)

Most of its work is done far ahead of an actual hurricane, according to team leader Chris Velden, providing online analyses and imagery to forecasters long before storms reach land using the resources of the Data Center of the UW-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center. After using Tropical Cyclone group products during Hurricane Katrina, National Hurricane Center Director Max Mayfield noted that CIMSS imagery and products would see much future use.

As they did with Katrina, forecasters at the hurricane center and in the National Weather Service will depend on those techniques and data for Tropical Storm Ophelia. According to Velden, Ophelia is "meandering between tropical storm and hurricane," and because it is hugging the coast, satellite-based data is less critical than other types of information, although still helpful. Velden expects the storm to continue up the coast and eventually move out to sea.
-end-
Velden can be reached at (608) 262-9168, chrisv@ssec.wisc.edu.

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Related Hurricane Articles:

Hurricane resilience in the Bahamas
A new Stanford-led study provides information on how to invest in natural coastal ecosystems that the Bahamian government, community leaders and development banks are applying in post-disaster recovery and future storm preparation in the Bahamas.
NASA finds a weaker hurricane Juliette
Hurricane Juliette has been weakening and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the strength of storms within.
NASA sees Dorian become a hurricane
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean as Dorian reached hurricane status during the afternoon of August 28, 2019.
Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria
Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities.
NASA sees Atlantic's Leslie become a hurricane
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Hurricane Leslie that revealed strong storms circled the center.
More Hurricane News and Hurricane Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...