Repeat vaccination is safe for most kids with mild to moderate reactions

September 14, 2018

September 14, 2018 - Children who experience some type of adverse event following initial immunization have a low rate of recurrent reactions to subsequent vaccinations, reports a study in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

"Most patients with a history of mild or moderate adverse events following immunization [AEFI] can be safely reimmunized," write Gaston De Serres, MD, of Laval University, Quebec, and colleagues. Although recurrent AEFIs can sometimes occur after repeat doses of vaccine, this study suggests that the risk of recurrent AEFIs after re-vaccination is relatively low, especially when the previous reaction was mild or moderate.

Safety of Repeat Vaccination after Initial Reactions - 'Passive Surveillance' Data In Quebec, healthcare professionals are legally required to report any "unusual or severe" AEFI related to a "passive surveillance" system similar to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) used in the United States. The analysis included 5,600 patients with AEFIs reported to Quebec's passive surveillance database from 1998 through 2016, all of whom required further doses of the vaccine to which they reacted. (The analysis excluded seasonal influenza vaccine, which changes from year to year.)

Of 1,731 patients with available follow-up data, 1,350 patients were re-vaccinated: a rate of 78 percent. Most of the re-vaccinated children were under two years old; about one-half of the AEFIs were allergic-like reactions.

Sixteen percent of patients experienced some type of recurrent AEFI after re-vaccination. In more than 80 percent of cases, the recurrent reaction was no more severe than the initial reaction. The researchers analyzed potential risk factors for recurrent reactions, including:

Prior to this study, there have been limited data on the safety of reimmunizing patients who had a prior AEFI. The study is one of the largest to estimate the rate of recurrent AEFIs by type of reaction and type of vaccine - key information for healthcare providers and parents/caregivers making decisions about further immunization. The results support the safety of continued vaccination especially when the previous reaction was mild or moderate.

The study provides helpful information on the risk of recurrent reactions to specific vaccines and in patients with different types of initial reactions. Dr. De Serres and coauthors suggest that vaccine adverse event passive surveillance systems could be adapted to include "systematic and standardized follow-up" to provide more complete information on recurrence risk and other outcomes for children with AEFIs .
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Click to read "Rate of Recurrence of Adverse Events Following Immunization: Results of 19 Years of Surveillance Ii Quebec, Canada"

DOI: 10.1097/INF.0000000000002162

About The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal®(PIDJ) is a complete, up-to-the-minute resource on infectious diseases in children. Through a mix of original studies, informative review articles, and unique case reports, PIDJ delivers the latest insights on combating disease in children -- from state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques to the most effective drug therapies and other treatment protocols. It is a resource that can improve patient care and stimulate your personal research. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal is the official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

About The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

Now in its 36th year, The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID) forms the basis for European investigators interested in infectious diseases in children and infection prevention in childhood. The society is engaged in a number of activities including the organisation of multicentre trials, international exchange of infectious disease fellows, and an annual meeting. Membership includes subscription to The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal® in addition to many other benefits.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the health, tax & accounting, finance, risk & compliance, and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer, headquartered in the Netherlands, reported 2017 annual revenues of €4.4 billion. The company serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit http://healthclarity.wolterskluwer.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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