Sage's Crime, Media, Culture scoops international award for Best New Journal

September 15, 2006

Research into the some of the most controversial issues facing society today, such as terrorism and the culture of fear, paedophiles in the community and binge drinking, combined with bold design and high production values, have won SAGE journal Crime, Media, Culture the prestigious Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers/ Charlesworth Award for Best New Journal. The Award was presented at a packed ceremony on Thursday night (14 September) at London's Armourers' Hall.

"We are thrilled that Crime, Media, Culture has won this Award, "said Ziyad Marar, Deputy Managing Director and Publishing Director at SAGE Publications. "The Journal was born from the passion and commitment of the academic editors and publishing team at SAGE, and we are proud to have launched such an important journal that is at the cutting edge of scholarly publishing."

Chair of the Panel of Judges, Alan Singleton, commended the journal's modern appearance and the excellence of the design and typography. He added that the journal itself is easy to read with an attractive font and clear layout.

Crime, Media, Culture was launched in April 2005 after the editors and the publisher identified the lack of a dedicated forum for the publication of work at the intersections of criminological and cultural inquiry. In their first editorial, editors Jeff Ferrell, Chris Greer and Yvonne Jewkes remarked: "In an age defined by media saturation and ubiquitous interpretive spin, the increasingly blurred boundaries between the represented and the real, and the highly mediatized and culturally shifting conceptions of community, identity and membership, a forum for the critical analysis of the relations between crime, media and culture seemed a necessity."

Topics covered have included: urban surveillance; paedophiles in the community; and terrorism and the culture of fear. The journal is typical of the innovative and intellectually rigorous academic publishing that SAGE champions.

The ALPSP/Charlesworth Award for Best New Journal is open to all publishers worldwide for journals launched within the last five years. The Panel received 26 applications and were impressed with the general high standard of all journals submitted. After much discussion, the judges decided to make this year's Best New Journal Award jointly to Crime, Media, Culture and Regenerative Medicine.
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Information about Crime, Media, Culture can be found at http://cmc.sagepub.com/, where the latest issue is freely available.

To receive a review copy of CMC, please contact Caroline Porter at SAGE.

SAGE Publications is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology and medicine. SAGE Publications, a privately owned corporation, has principal offices in Thousand Oaks, California, London, United Kingdom, and New Delhi, India. www.sagepublications.com

SAGE

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