Nav: Home

MRI improves diagnosis of microbleeding after brain injury in military personnel

September 15, 2015

OAK BROOK, Ill. - Imaging patients soon after traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs can lead to better (more accurate) detection of cerebral microhemorrhages, or microbleeding on the brain, according to a study of military service members, published online in the journal Radiology.

Cerebral microhemorrhages occur as a direct result of TBI and can lead to severe secondary injuries such as brain swelling or stroke. The ability to monitor the evolution of microhemorrhages could provide important information regarding disease progression or recovery.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Injury and Prevention Control, about 1.7 million people in the United States sustain TBI each year. Furthermore, the Institute of Medicine reports that 20 to 23 percent of military service members deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq have sustained TBI while serving.

"TBI is a large problem for our military service members and their families," said Dr. Gerard Riedy, M.D., Ph.D., chief of neuroimaging at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. "We found that many of those who have served and suffered this type of injury were not imaged until many, many months after injury occurred thus resulting in lower rates of cerebral microhemorrhage detection which delays treatment."

For the study, Dr. Riedy and colleagues used susceptibility-weighted imaging--an MRI technique that provides improved visibility of blood and is highly sensitive to hemorrhage--to evaluate 603 military service members with TBI. The median time from point of injury to imaging was 856 days. Of the 603 military service members who participated in the study, 7 percent were found to have at least one occurrence of cerebral microhemorrhage.

The patients were divided into four groups based on time since the injury occurred, ranging from less than three months to over a year. The results found that those who were imaged more than a year after the injury had a much lower occurrence of cerebral microhemorrhages than those who were scanned 12 months or fewer after TBI.

Cerebral microhemorrhage was identified in 24 percent of military personnel who were imaged within three months post-injury, compared to 5.2 percent of the patients who were imaged over a year later. The researchers attribute this to changes in iron deposits in the brain as time goes on, making it more difficult to detect microbleeding.

"Early characterization of cerebral microhemorrhages may help to explain clinical symptoms of acute TBI and identify the severity of brain damage," Dr. Riedy said. "We believe that having access to MRI in the field would facilitate early detection of TBI, thus providing timely treatment."

The study also supports previous claims that using susceptibility-weighted imaging to evaluate brain injury patients may be more effective than conventional MRI. In this study's capacity, using susceptibility-weighted imaging resulted in detecting significantly more microhemorrhages due to a higher spatial resolution and signal, with 77 percent of cerebral microhemorrhages appearing more evident through susceptibility-weighted imaging when compared to conventional MRI.
-end-
"Imaging Cerebral Microhemorrhages in Military Service Members with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury." Collaborating with Dr. Riedy on this paper were Wei Liu, D.Sc., Karl Soderlund, M.D., Justin S. Senseney, M.S., David Joy, B.S., Ping-Hony Yeh, Ph.D., John Ollinger, Ph.D., Elyssa B. Sham, B.A., Tian Liu, Ph.D., Yi Wang, Ph.D., Terrence R. Oakes, Ph.D.

Radiology is edited by Herbert Y. Kressel, M.D., Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., and owned and published by the Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (http://radiology.rsna.org/)

RSNA is an association of more than 54,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists promoting excellence in patient care and health care delivery through education, research and technologic innovation. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

For patient-friendly information on MRI of the brain, visit RadiologyInfo.org.

Radiological Society of North America

Related Traumatic Brain Injury Articles:

Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury
A team of NJIT biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue.
Predictors of cognitive recovery following mild to severe traumatic brain injury
Researchers have shown that higher intelligence and younger age are predictors of greater cognitive recovery 2-5 years post-mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Which car crashes cause traumatic brain injury?
Motor vehicle crashes are one of the most common causes of TBI-related emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths.
Traumatic brain injury and kids: New treatment guidelines issued
To help promote the highest standards of care, and improve the overall rates of survival and recovery following TBI, a panel of pediatric critical care, neurosurgery and other pediatric experts today issued the third edition of the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Severe TBI.
Addressing sleep disorders after traumatic brain injury
Amsterdam, NL, December 10, 2018 - Disorders of sleep are some of the most common problems experienced by patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI).
More Traumatic Brain Injury News and Traumatic Brain Injury Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...