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Cassini's legacy and the atmospheric chemistry of Titan (video)

September 15, 2017

WASHINGTON, Sept. 15, 2017 -- The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, is set to end on Sept. 15. The mission has told us a great deal about the unique and unexpected chemistry of Saturn's moon Titan, and it has changed the way we think about our own planet and the entire solar system. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry: https://youtu.be/Dee0V7axuPI.
-end-
Speaking of Chemistry is a production of Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. It's the series that keeps you up to date with the important and fascinating chemistry shaping the world around you. Subscribe to the series at http://www.youtube.com/cenonline, and follow us on Twitter @CENMag.

The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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