Improved physician-patient relationships are associated with improved health

September 15, 2020

This study found an association between improved physician-patient relationships and improved patient-reported health status. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found over a one-year period that while consistent access to a provider is important, the quality of each clinical encounter is equally as important in shaping a patient's reported overall health outcomes, as measured by the SF-12 quality of life questionnaire.

The authors also found some evidence that adults with five or more diagnosed conditions experience physician-patient relationships that are significantly lower in quality than those reported by adults without multimorbidity. This discrepancy may reflect unmet physician-patient relationship needs among adults bearing multimorbidity burdens and indicate another opportunity for intervention. The study findings can potentially inform health care strategies and health policy aimed at improving patient-centered health outcomes.
-end-
Assessing the Longitudinal Impact of Physician-Patient Relationship on Functional Health
R. Henry Olaisen, MPH, PhD, et al
Case Western Reserve University, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland, Ohio
https://www.annfammed.org/content/18/5/422

American Academy of Family Physicians

Related Multimorbidity Articles from Brightsurf:

Multiple neurodevelopmental conditions may lead to worse educational outcomes
Scottish children with multiple neurodevelopmental conditions experience greater school absenteeism and exclusion, poorer exam attainment and increased unemployment, according to a study published October 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Michael Fleming of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues.

Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19.

Persons with Parkinson's disease can have a brighter future
Well over six million people globally have been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, which has an enormous impact on the lives of patients and their families and incurring mounting costs for society.

Healthier lifestyles may increase lifespan even in people with multiple chronic conditions
A very healthy lifestyle is associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women, regardless of the presence of multiple chronic conditions, according to a study published September 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yogini Chudasama of the University of Leicester, and colleagues.

Improved physician-patient relationships are associated with improved health
This study found an association between improved physician-patient relationships and improved patient-reported health status.

September/October 2020 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.

Childhood maltreatment linked to higher risk of multiple health conditions in later life
People who suffer one or more forms of maltreatment in childhood have a higher chance of multimorbidity in later life.

Study quantifies China's chronic health burden for the first time
University of Melbourne researchers have quantified the toll that having multiple chronic diseases takes in China for the first time, which could have significant implications for its economic and health systems.

Long-term risks of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy impact more women
Twice as many women who experienced a hypertensive disorder during any of their pregnancies were at increased risk of developing heart or kidney diseases earlier in life based on incidence per woman versus per pregnancy, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition.

Read More: Multimorbidity News and Multimorbidity Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.