Fewer cases of antibiotic-resistant MRSA infection in the US in 2011

September 16, 2013

An estimated 30,800 fewer invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections occurred in the United States in 2011 compared to 2005, according to a study by Raymund Dantes, M.D., M.P.H., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues.

MRSA is one of the most common antimicrobial-resistant pathogens causing infections, especially in the skin and soft tissues.

The researchers estimated that 80,461 invasive MRSA infections occurred nationally in 2011. Of those, 48,353 were health care-associated community-onset infections (HACO); 14,156 were hospital-onset infections; and 16,560 were community-associated infections, according to the results.

Since 2005, national estimated incidence rates have decreased 27.7 percent for HACO infections, 54.2 percent for hospital-onset infections and 5 percent for community-onset infections.

"Despite these decreases, invasive MRSA infections with onset in the community or outpatient setting remain problematic and represent the majority of invasive MRSA infections. Future research is needed to understand the progression of colonization and non-invasive MRSA infection to invasive infection in outpatient settings. Future prevention efforts should target both community and health care transmission, especially among patients with recent hospitalization," the study concludes.
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(JAMA Intern Med. Published online September 16, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.10423. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)



Editor's Note:
This work was supported by the Emerging Infections Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Please see article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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